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Removing DuraCoat & refinishing tutorial

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    Removing DuraCoat & refinishing tutorial

    Why? Well, DuraCoat is a fine finish product I use (of course the baked-on Cerakote is the best) but it can go right over blueing and is rather easy to remove chemically. Being a popular DIY gun coating there are many examples of sloppy jobs, and even under a good job, an intact collectible gun may be found.

    Case in point...was in the market for a late 60s R870 wingmaster in a particular serial range to use as a donor gun for a Mark I USMC Vietnam trench gun clone project (those are super rare $$$, but are basically built on a 870 wingmaster). Nice wingmasters are now commanding premium prices but I found one in that time/range I was looking for that also had nice wood and a mag extension and looked solid but no one was bidding on it due to a horrible color choice and not so great DuraCoat job. I got it for a steal and here's the refinishing...


    Before - During - After
    duracoat_ref_3.jpg

    The ugly ducking was intact with some great wood and an extension...got it at a great price point because of that color/paint job...

    duracoat_ref_0.jpg

    Two products work well. M.E.K. is super toxic so only use for stubborn jobs. I find that Jasco Paint & Epoxy Remover works great on DuraCoat, or any moly-resin, as well as stocks covered in truck bedliner or rubber (old police patrol guns for instance).

    In both cases wear a respirator with proper cartridges for V.O.C.s, gloves and eye protection and have proper ventilation.

    duracoat_ref_2.jpg

    The Jasco epoxy remover is a clear gel and brushes on. The process is simple.

    A. Use a throw-away brush, and non scratch pads, an old toothbrush and aluminum pan and paper towels.

    B. Brush on a decent coating of the epoxy remover and allow to sit for several minutes. Be careful of surroundings.

    C. The DuraCoat coating should start lifting and bubbling up.

    D. When the bubbling is significant you can start carefully scraping it off. In areas with more gel it can slide right off with a paper towel.

    E. Continue to remove by wiping of the gel and broken-down epoxy mix. Reapply more gel to stubborn spots where the coating remains.

    F. For nooks and recessed writing, etc. use a soft bristle brush and/or toothpics. You can spot-apply more gel and wipe until you have clean metal everywhere.

    duracoat_ref_4.jpg

    For refinish DuraCoat, a solvent clean is needed. I often use Acetone or Denature Alcohol wipe-down for a prep and be careful not to get oils of body oils back on prior to painting. Let it flash off and dry and re-apply your gun coating (I recommend using fine light coats from an airbrush, you can get a cheap kit from Commie Freight Tools that should suffice).,


    The refinished gun, with a new swapped in fore-end and extension painted in a Parkerized color moly-resin.
    duracoat_ref_1.jpg
    Last edited by Destro; 07-17-2020, 05:43 PM.

    #2
    It came out great, nice job.

    Comment


      #3
      You are to be commended for saving that poor shotgun from that horrible color choice.

      It came out beautiful.
      Steve

      Comment


        #4
        Who needs You Tube when we have Destro . Thanks for posting and looks terrific.

        Comment


          #5
          That’s freaking awesome! I love it.

          Comment

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