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Blackhawk Vehicle QD Med Pouch

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    Blackhawk Vehicle QD Med Pouch

    Blackhawk Vehicle QD Med Pouch

    A lot of time is spent by shooters discussing tactics and gear, but little time is spent by most people on other survival skills and gear. For example, relatively few people know the basics of how to deal with a gunshot would, how to apply a tourniquet or even know what to do if someone is choking. Fewer still have the medical tools they might need in an emergency.

    While learning the skills is on you, Blackhawk is attempting to make it easier to have the tools on hand should you ever need them. The Vehicle QD Med Pouch allows you to attach a trauma kit to the headrest or visor of your car or truck. Should you ever need the equipment – say at the range after an accidental shooting or when driving down the road and you come across a motor vehicle collision – the pouch easily rips off of the mount to go with you.

    What you pack in the pouch is largely dependent on your level of training. Basic gear like a CPR barrier, gloves, Israeli bandage, QuikClot Combat Gauze, HALO chest seal and a SOF Tactical Tourniquet will make sense for a lot of people. For those with more advanced training, a decompression needle or NPA might also make sense.

    Hopefully, you will never need any of the items in the kit, but it is better to get the training and gear in case you ever are faced with a medical emergency. The life you save could be your own.

    The Blackhawk pouch has a MSRP of $41.95. In many cases, what you stuff it with should set you back less than $75. Pete took a look at the complete trauma kit offered by ITS Tactical. I have a similar kit from ITS and can vouch for its quality.
    Pat ------> NRA Endowment Member

    #2
    Group buy?

    Comment


      #3
      I have to admit that I carry some gear in my first aid kit that I have not received enough training on and I look at it sometimes and wonder why I keep carrying it.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by pandm View Post
        I have to admit that I carry some gear in my first aid kit that I have not received enough training on and I look at it sometimes and wonder why I keep carrying it.
        Probably bc your kit can be used to help yourself, not just others. You may not have the training, but someone nearby may have it and you'll be glad you had it.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by pandm View Post
          I have to admit that I carry some gear in my first aid kit that I have not received enough training on and I look at it sometimes and wonder why I keep carrying it.
          A skin stapler may be the way to go in an emergency when you are unable to close a wound with a needle and thread.

          I never used one, but it seems a lot easier than the “sewing” method.


          http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/AnimalCareNA/Home/ProductCatalog/~/3M-Precise-Multi-Shot-Disposable-Skin-Stapler-System?N=7578309+3294393263&rt=rud

          3m-precise-multi-shot-disposable-skin-stapler-5bf.jpg sts117_omsrepair05.jpg


          The above disposable unit is for "animal care". However, there are plenty of other models intended for humans.

          Last edited by SimpleMan; 05-29-2016, 03:48 PM.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by SimpleMan View Post

            A skin stapler may be the way to go in an emergency when you are unable to close a wound with a needle and thread.

            I never used one, but it seems a lot easier than the “sewing” method.


            http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/AnimalCareNA/Home/ProductCatalog/~/3M-Precise-Multi-Shot-Disposable-Skin-Stapler-System?N=7578309+3294393263&rt=rud

            [ATTACH=CONFIG]n25959[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]n25960[/ATTACH]

            crazy glue or electrical tape works , but the staples do not hurt as much , how much

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by SimpleMan View Post

              A skin stapler may be the way to go in an emergency when you are unable to close a wound with a needle and thread.

              I never used one, but it seems a lot easier than the “sewing” method.


              http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/AnimalCareNA/Home/ProductCatalog/~/3M-Precise-Multi-Shot-Disposable-Skin-Stapler-System?N=7578309+3294393263&rt=rud

              [ATTACH=CONFIG]n25959[/ATTACH] [ATTACH=CONFIG]n25960[/ATTACH]


              The above disposable unit is for "animal care". However, there are plenty of other models intended for humans.
              I used to work in the Stony Brook ER.... the stapler was used quite a bit for head lacerations, much easier then sewing.
              Brandon

              NRA LIFE | SAF | UT / NH / FL / CT / NY CCW | RSO | FREEPORT R&R

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by SimpleMan View Post

                A skin stapler may be the way to go in an emergency when you are unable to close a wound with a needle and thread.

                I never used one, but it seems a lot easier than the “sewing” method.



                Having used one on myself, and pets/farm animals, the trick is knowing when to close a wound, and when to leave it open. They also have limitations, you need to know when to use sutures over staples and the other way around.

                Im not knowledgeable enough to give advice, but you should 100% do your own research.

                Another thing: Spend the money on the name brand ones, the cheap ones will only serve to piss you off.

                Comment

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