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Quick Pistol Drill for the Range

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    Quick Pistol Drill for the Range

    An important skill to have in order to be accurate with your pistol is, "not to move that muzzle".

    Next time you go to your range, try this drill:

    1- insert your loaded mag and chamber 1 round.
    2- remove the mag and keep only 1 round in the gun.
    3- fire the shot (slide will not lock back) and immediately pull the trigger again on the empty chamber.

    Did you notice any flinching or muzzle movement? Just keep doing the drill until the mag is empty.

    Let me know how this works out for you.
    Last edited by Nicys; 04-30-2018, 11:28 AM.

    #2
    Having done many different kinds of pistol drills and having instructed the same, I have to say there is a major flaw with your drill - you know there is no round in the chamber thus do not expect recoil and then have no reason to compensate for recoil. A much better drill would require you to invest in some dummy rounds, randomly load one or a couple, along with live ammo, into a couple of your magazines, load another one or two mags with only live ammo, mix them up. Better yet, have someone else load your mags. Not only will this help determine if you are anticipating recoil and flinching but it will allow you to do malfunction drills when you unexpectedly arrive at the dummy round(s). Same can be done with a revolver, put one or two randomly into the chambers and the rest live ammo.

    all the best,
    GB
    Retired and loving it.

    Comment


      #3
      Another drill....has many skills built in ...formatted so you can track progress ( or lack ) called Dot Torture Drill............ https://www.luckygunner.com/lounge/s...torture-drill/

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Glenn B View Post
        Having done many different kinds of pistol drills and having instructed the same, I have to say there is a major flaw with your drill - you know there is no round in the chamber thus do not expect recoil and then have no reason to compensate for recoil. A much better drill would require you to invest in some dummy rounds, randomly load one or a couple, along with live ammo, into a couple of your magazines, load another one or two mags with only live ammo, mix them up. Better yet, have someone else load your mags. Not only will this help determine if you are anticipating recoil and flinching but it will allow you to do malfunction drills when you unexpectedly arrive at the dummy round(s). Same can be done with a revolver, put one or two randomly into the chambers and the rest live ammo.

        all the best,
        GB
        Its a good drill. Not everyone has dummy rounds or a friend to load them. How are you going to get your dummy rounds back once they bounce in front of the point at MF?

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Glenn B View Post
          Having done many different kinds of pistol drills and having instructed the same, I have to say there is a major flaw with your drill - you know there is no round in the chamber thus do not expect recoil and then have no reason to compensate for recoil. A much better drill would require you to invest in some dummy rounds, randomly load one or a couple, along with live ammo, into a couple of your magazines, load another one or two mags with only live ammo, mix them up. Better yet, have someone else load your mags. Not only will this help determine if you are anticipating recoil and flinching but it will allow you to do malfunction drills when you unexpectedly arrive at the dummy round(s). Same can be done with a revolver, put one or two randomly into the chambers and the rest live ammo.

          all the best,
          GB
          I disagree . I ve found it to be a very helpful drill . I practiced it a lot when I first started to get rid of my flinch.

          I wouldn’t discount it , but to each their own .
          Last edited by Pitbull428; 05-02-2018, 11:06 AM.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Glenn B View Post
            Having done many different kinds of pistol drills and having instructed the same, I have to say there is a major flaw with your drill - you know there is no round in the chamber thus do not expect recoil and then have no reason to compensate for recoil. A much better drill would require you to invest in some dummy rounds, randomly load one or a couple, along with live ammo, into a couple of your magazines, load another one or two mags with only live ammo, mix them up. Better yet, have someone else load your mags. Not only will this help determine if you are anticipating recoil and flinching but it will allow you to do malfunction drills when you unexpectedly arrive at the dummy round(s). Same can be done with a revolver, put one or two randomly into the chambers and the rest live ammo.

            all the best,
            GB



            I disagree. I had the pleasure of learning this drill from. SHOmestyle the week before last in his skills and drills class and I found it to be beneficial.. I used it with a draw from the holster and besides getting that first shoT on target quickly, I could tell where there was unnecessary movement on that follow up shot. I’ve done all the drills you talk about with snap caps, etc. they’re all good drills but this one is especially good for someone who’s training alone and wants to make sure that second shot on the draw is as close to the first as possible.

            Comment


              #7
              So, are you both implying that you flinch when you know there is no round in the chamber and this drill helped you overcome anticipating recoil that you should have realized was not going to happen and thus helped to overcome flinching in response to the recoil you anticipated from an empty chamber - or is it you were jerking the trigger and this drill helped with that? I understand how this may have helped you not jerk the trigger, I cannot for a moment fathom how it would help relative to flinching due to recoil anticipation.
              Retired and loving it.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Glenn B View Post
                So, are you both implying that you flinch when you know there is no round in the chamber and this drill helped you overcome anticipating recoil that you should have realized was not going to happen and thus helped to overcome flinching in response to the recoil you anticipated from an empty chamber - or is it you were jerking the trigger and this drill helped with that? I understand how this may have helped you not jerk the trigger, I cannot for a moment fathom how it would help relative to flinching due to recoil anticipation.

                Im not implying anything , It ihelped me virtually eliminate the flinch I developed at the onset of my pistol shooting . I didn’t jerk the trigger . I flinched.

                I ve performed the ball and dummy drill as well


                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Glenn B View Post
                  So, are you both implying that you flinch when you know there is no round in the chamber and this drill helped you overcome anticipating recoil that you should have realized was not going to happen and thus helped to overcome flinching in response to the recoil you anticipated from an empty chamber - or is it you were jerking the trigger and this drill helped with that? I understand how this may have helped you not jerk the trigger, I cannot for a moment fathom how it would help relative to flinching due to recoil anticipation.
                  For me it’s more about jerking the trigger when increasing speed especially from a draw.

                  BTW, I don’t see a difference with you knowing the next shot is a dry fire vs someone setting you up with dummy rounds.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Pitbull428 View Post


                    Im not implying anything , It ihelped me virtually eliminate the flinch I developed at the onset of my pistol shooting . I didn’t jerk the trigger . I flinched.

                    I ve performed the ball and dummy drill as well

                    What I do not understand is how you can flinch when you know there is no round in the chamber. A flinch is a reaction. In the case of firing a pistol it is usually in reaction to the shooters anticipation of the noise of the shot and or the recoil or to the actual noise and recoil. If you were doing it when you knew there was no round in the chamber and that the pistol would not fire then it would seem to me you were not flinching but jerking the trigger because why flinch when the gun will not go off. Just saying that because I do not understand how you flinch in anticipation of already having knowledge that the gun is not about to fire. I guess it can happen if it is very badly ingrained but I have never witnessed such a case before so it makes me wonder. Trying to learn more as we go along.
                    Retired and loving it.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Llaara View Post

                      For me it’s more about jerking the trigger when increasing speed especially from a draw.

                      BTW, I don’t see a difference with you knowing the next shot is a dry fire vs someone setting you up with dummy rounds.
                      As I have explained it above: You know the gun is not about to fire - so for someone who is trying to correct flinching - why would they flinch when they know the gun is not about to go off. Having dummy rounds in the mag allows the hammer to fall on one without you knowing it is about to happen. Thus you are likely to flinch in anticipation because you have no idea if it will go off or not. It is a way to help determine if you more likely are flinching or if you are jerking the trigger. In addition, the firing pin hitting a dummy round also should immediately put you into a malfunction drill. Thus you are killing to birds with one dummy round.
                      Retired and loving it.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by E View Post

                        Its a good drill. Not everyone has dummy rounds or a friend to load them. How are you going to get your dummy rounds back once they bounce in front of the point at MF?
                        Dummy rounds can be purchased in any decent gun store or online. They are easy to come by. As for requiring a friend to load for you - who said that? Not me. I suggested it is better for someone else to load them for you because then you have absolutely no clue as to which the next might be - dummy or live. You can always load them yourself, just do it randomly and add in at least a full mag or two of live rounds to really help mix things up.

                        As far as retrieving any dummy rounds that fall forward of the firing line, you would do that the same way you would retrieve anything that falls forward of the line like magazines, headsets, eye protection, and whatever. You go get a range officer, he calls a cease fire, he gets it for you - that is the safest way and the only way I would do it.
                        Retired and loving it.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          By the way, next time I am running through drills, I am going to try this method mentioned by the OP. I figure why not, maybe I will learn something valuable from it and then again maybe not but if I don't try it I will never know.
                          Retired and loving it.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            This is less about eliminating anticipatory flinch than it is about improving trigger pull technique.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by mattyj513 View Post
                              This is less about eliminating anticipatory flinch than it is about improving trigger pull technique.
                              Dummy rounds will show/illustrate and help solve jerking the trigger, trigger slapping or any other pre-shot habit.

                              My wife, who is (generally) very smart, perceptive and well reasoned(and I swear she doesn't have a bat to my head as I type this) but for years has set the kitchen clock and her car clock ahead 10 minutes. Why? Because she'd see the clock, think she was late and end up getting places on time. So again, while quite brainy, she was inexplicably willingly susceptible to this self played trick on herself.

                              I guess if your allowing yourself to be fooled by yourself and the drill works then good on you. Maybe you can tickle yourself too,

                              This isn't that hard. Does anyone here really only have one mag for their guns? Load up three or four mags, interspersing three dummy rounds randomly in each. Don't make them the first or last rounds. Toss them in your pocket/pouch/on the loading table. Now you don't truly don't know when the dummy is coming. For extra points do it the night before for extra surprise factor. As an added bonus you're getting to practice Tap, Rack, Bang/Ready after each failure to fire.

                              You can diagnose the fault by simply looking at where your rounds fall.
                              trigger-pull-target-300x298.jpg

                              Or, not as a diagnostic, but as a concentration on task drill, a coin or a spent shell casing work equally well.....

                              Shooting_005.jpg

                              At the end of the day one of the best things you can do is dry fire.....over and over and over and over.
                              When they kick out your front door
                              How you gonna come?
                              With your hands on your head
                              Or on the trigger of your gun?

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