Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ammo prices today and tomorrow...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    Originally posted by Range Time View Post

    Smart from a Sportsman perspective...

    ​​​​​...but exactly what they want.
    Not smart from a defensive standpoint. Unless you're fighting off Squirrels and Starlings.

    Comment


    • Genghis Khan
      Genghis Khan commented
      Editing a comment
      How about Ferrets?

    • raceradam
      raceradam commented
      Editing a comment
      155mm and above. Otherwise, they scoff.

    #47
    Originally posted by Vitaman View Post

    With L-ion batteries being what they are, I could imagine that electro-magnetic firearms may soon be on the horizon, along the lines of the Navy's hypervelocity rail gun The U.S. Navy's Electromagnetic Railgun Will Fire Supersonic Ammo (yahoo.com)
    Plasma rifle in the 40 watt range.

    Comment


      #48
      Originally posted by raceradam View Post

      Not smart from a defensive standpoint. Unless you're fighting off Squirrels and Starlings.
      And if you were fighting squirrels with an air gun, you'd still need a real gun to fend off Lovemyglock !

      Comment


        #49
        Originally posted by mcsprocket View Post

        We can't assume that, however, if demand is way up AND ammo manufacturers are producing ammo 24/7 and producing significantly more ammo than they produced in previous years, clearly supply is up. Granted demand is outstripping supply but the quantity of ammo being sold far exceeds what was sold in 2019 (and 2020).

        Someone is making way more money than they did in 2019. My bet is on the distributors. They are the ones that jacked up the prices.
        What reason do you have to assume production/supply is up across the industry? Just because SOME plants are back up and running near full capacity doesnt mean all are. And what kind of backlog is there from the time they were down? Do government contracts take priority over civilian production? And how do they prioritize big box stores vs distributors? And how do distributors prioritize their LGS customers? I'm sure everyone across the board is seeing more demand, and thus supply would be split between many more customers, diminishing the supply going to any one customer. Clearly prices are higher across the entire supply chain, but is everyone really making more? Or are part of the increases so they can make the same on less supply?

        Comment


          #50
          Originally posted by BillyBonds View Post

          What reason do you have to assume production/supply is up across the industry? Just because SOME plants are back up and running near full capacity doesnt mean all are. And what kind of backlog is there from the time they were down? Do government contracts take priority over civilian production? And how do they prioritize big box stores vs distributors? And how do distributors prioritize their LGS customers? I'm sure everyone across the board is seeing more demand, and thus supply would be split between many more customers, diminishing the supply going to any one customer. Clearly prices are higher across the entire supply chain, but is everyone really making more? Or are part of the increases so they can make the same on less supply?
          Watch the videos by the Federal CEO, Nosler CEO, etc. They actually answer most of your questions.

          They all say the same thing. They are producing more ammo than they have ever produced. WAY more ammo. They have 3 shifts running every day. They are now 24/7. Primers are scarce because their in house primers go to ammo manufacturing before being sold as components.

          Comment


            #51
            Originally posted by mcsprocket View Post

            Watch the videos by the Federal CEO, Nosler CEO, etc. They actually answer most of your questions.

            They all say the same thing. They are producing more ammo than they have ever produced. WAY more ammo. They have 3 shifts running every day. They are now 24/7. Primers are scarce because their in house primers go to ammo manufacturing before being sold as components.
            I did, and it only reinforces my opinion. Federal make everything in house, brass, primers, bullets, etc. He even states that they are not selling components in favor of using them to make their own ammo, which obviously would impede production and smaller manufacturers who buy some of the components. He also says he has no way of boosting production, or plans to expand in order to increase production, because it would take years to build new factories. Further, he used the example of 6 million new gun owners buying 2 boxes of ammo each, and how long it would take fill that additional demand with current production. So where are those first time gun buyers purchasing 2 boxes of ammo? TSUSA? Or their LGS? It reinforces my point that higher demand at every retail outlet would yield less volume going to any one outlet. What he didnt mention was if production had ever been shut down, or limited, and what kind of backlog they may have with certain contracts, which could be limiting the flow of ammo to retail.

            Comment

            Working...
            X