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Today in history Feb 16, 1804 - Navy kicked ass

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    Today in history Feb 16, 1804 - Navy kicked ass

    1804February 16U.S. Navy stages daring mission during First Barbary War


    During the First Barbary War, U.S. Lieutenant Stephen Decatur leads a military mission that famed British Admiral Horatio Nelson calls the “most daring act of the age.”

    In June 1801, President Thomas Jefferson ordered U.S. Navy vessels to the Mediterranean Sea in protest of continuing raids against U.S. ships by pirates from the Barbary states–Morocco, Algeria, Tunis and Tripolitania. American sailors were often abducted along with the captured booty and ransomed back to the United States at an exorbitant price. After two years of minor confrontations, sustained action began in June 1803 when a small U.S. expeditionary force attacked Tripoli harbor in present-day Libya.

    In October 1803, the U.S. frigate Philadelphia ran aground near Tripoli and was captured by Tripolitan gunboats. The Americans feared that the well-constructed warship would be both a formidable addition to the Tripolitan navy and an innovative model for building future Tripolitan frigates. Hoping to prevent the Barbary pirates from gaining this military advantage, Lieutenant Stephen Decatur led a daring expedition into Tripoli harbor to destroy the captured American vessel on February 16, 1804.

    After disguising himself and his men as Maltese sailors, Decatur’s force of 74 men, which included nine U.S. Marines, sailed into Tripoli harbor on a small two-mast ship. The Americans approached the USS Philadelphia without drawing fire from the Tripoli shore guns, boarded the ship, and attacked its Tripolitan crew, capturing or killing all but two. After setting fire to the frigate, Decatur and his men escaped without the loss of a single American. The Philadelphia subsequently exploded when its gunpowder reserve was lit by the spreading fire.

    Six months later, Decatur returned to Tripoli Harbor as part of a larger American offensive and emerged as a hero again during the so-called “Battle of the Gunboats,” a naval battle that saw hand-to-hand combat between the Americans and the Tripolitans.
    During the First Barbary War, U.S. Lieutenant Stephen Decatur leads a military mission that famed British Admiral Horatio Nelson calls the “most daring act of

    #2
    Outstanding

    Comment


      #3
      Just another example of Colonialism, those poor pirates had no chance vs...

      LOL

      Wait a minute, the Americans did what the great Naval powers of that time couldn't. They stopped these terrorists from holding ships hostage where Spain and England just paid the ransom for their release. The amount those Pirates asked for the Philadelphia was a lot more than our fledgling Government could afford so Jefferson took action.

      Ps: It's where the Marines got the knick name Leathernecks because they wore leather around their necks to protect themselves from the swords of these pirates.

      And No, I wasn't alive back then Pate'.
      True freedom and our inherent responsibility:
      https://www.biblegateway.com/passage...18&version=NLT
      https://www.biblegateway.com/passage...hronicles+7:14

      Comment


        #4
        muzzie aggression. Nuthin new under the sun.
        Exercise the Bill of Rights. It's good for your Constitution.

        Comment


          #5
          a splash of "Old Spice " and off to kick some ass

          Comment


            #6
            Anchors Aweigh!

            Comment


              #7
              In October 1803, Tripoli's fleet captured USS Philadelphia intact after the frigate ran aground on a reef while patrolling Tripoli harbor. Efforts by the Americans to float the ship while under fire from shore batteries and Tripolitan Naval units failed. The ship, her captain, William Bainbridge, and all officers and crew were taken ashore and held as hostages. Philadelphia was turned against the Americans and anchored in the harbor as a gun battery.

              An 1897 painting of the burning of the USS Philadelphia

              On the night of 16 February 1804, Captain Stephen Decatur led a small detachment of U.S. Marines aboard the captured Tripolitan ketch rechristened USS Intrepid, thus deceiving the guards on Philadelphia to float close enough to board her. Decatur's men stormed the ship and overpowered the Tripolitan sailors. With fire support from the American warships, the Marines set fire to Philadelphia, denying her use by the enemy.

              Preble attacked Tripoli on 14 July 1804, in a series of inconclusive battles, including an unsuccessful attack attempting to use Intrepid under Captain Richard Somers as a fire ship, packed with explosives and sent to enter Tripoli harbor, where she would destroy herself and the enemy fleet. However, Intrepid was destroyed, possibly by enemy gunfire, before she achieved her goal, killing Somers and his entire crew.[38]

              The turning point in the war was the Battle of Derna (April–May 1805). Ex-consul William Eaton, a former Army captain who used the title of "general", and US Marine Corps 1st Lieutenant Presley O'Bannon led a force of eight U.S. Marines [39] and five hundred mercenaries—Greeks from Crete, Arabs, and Berbers—on a march across the desert from Alexandria, Egypt, to capture the Tripolitan city of Derna. This was the first time the United States flag was raised in victory on foreign soil. The action is memorialized in a line of the Marines' Hymn—"the shores of Tripoli".[40] The capturing of the city gave American negotiators leverage in securing the return of hostages and the end of the war.[41]
              Last edited by Dan 0351; 02-16-2021, 10:42 PM.
              "The Open Carry guy is my decoy."

              Comment


              • Volkosupply
                Volkosupply commented
                Editing a comment
                So there we were....no shit it was like 9 of us and some Greek guys we convinced to come along.....

              • Dan 0351
                Dan 0351 commented
                Editing a comment
                Pretty much. It's also where the Marine Corps earned the Mameluke sword - still worn to this day by Marine Corps officers. I believe it to be the oldest weapon still used by the U.S. military (albeit ceremonial now).
                https://www.c4isrnet.com/video/2018/...ameluke-sword/

              • Dan 0351
                Dan 0351 commented
                Editing a comment
                Posted that prior to see @Aquabach's post.

              #8
              Awesome.

              In today's PC, pussified world they would be considered terrorists.

              Comment


                #9
                United States Marine Corps Mameluke Sword


                Today's U.S. Marine Corps officers' Mameluke sword closely resembles those first worn in 1826.

                Marine Corps history states that a sword of this type was presented to Marine
                First LieutenantPresley O'Bannon by the Ottoman Empireviceroy, Prince Hamet, on December 8, 1805, during the First Barbary War, in Libya, as a gesture of respect and praise for the Marines' actions at the Battle of Derna (1805).[4] Upon his return to the United States, the state of Virginia presented him with a silver-hilted sword featuring an eaglehead hilt and a curved blade modeled after the original Mameluke sword given to him by Hamet. Its blade is inscribed with his name and a commemoration of the Battle of Tripoli Harbor.[5]

                Due to the Marines' distinguished record during this campaign, including the capture of the Tripolitan city of Derna after a long and dangerous desert march, Marine Corps CommandantArchibald Henderson adopted the Mameluke sword in 1825 for wear by Marine officers. After initial distribution in 1826, Mameluke swords have been worn except for the years 1859–1875 (when Marine officers were required to wear the U.S. Model 1850 Army foot officers' sword), and a brief period when swords were suspended during World War II. Since that time, Mameluke swords have been worn by Marine officers in a continuing tradition to the present day.[6]
                "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." Martin Luther King, Jr.

                Comment


                  #10
                  The religion of peace has been spreading their peace, and getting their asses kicked for it by America's armed forces, my thanks to all who've served, for alot longer than many realize. Many also don't realize to this day places like libya still have open slave markets, selling mostly Africans. joe biden lifted travel restrictions on libya asap after taking the big chair, but remember, you ain't black if you didn't vote for him.

                  But I digress.

                  Comment


                  • Barnslayer
                    Barnslayer commented
                    Editing a comment
                    No calls to end slavery in the Mid East. Nothing about muzzie racism or a demand for reparations either

                  • mattyj513
                    mattyj513 commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Always found it comical that our domestic groups that proclaim to be for the betterment of muslims, blacks, gays, women, the environment, little snowflake children etc, support groups, countries, and businesses that are actively engaged in slavery, execute gays, treat women like dogs, use child labor (side note child labor laws are one of the top 3 reasons this country is circling the drain), and destroy the environment. If all the parties the left backs achieved their end games, the left would be murdered, sold, and subjugated.

                  #11
                  Originally posted by Aquabach View Post
                  United States Marine Corps Mameluke Sword


                  Today's U.S. Marine Corps officers' Mameluke sword closely resembles those first worn in 1826.

                  Marine Corps history states that a sword of this type was presented to Marine
                  First LieutenantPresley O'Bannon by the Ottoman Empireviceroy, Prince Hamet, on December 8, 1805, during the First Barbary War, in Libya, as a gesture of respect and praise for the Marines' actions at the Battle of Derna (1805).[4] Upon his return to the United States, the state of Virginia presented him with a silver-hilted sword featuring an eaglehead hilt and a curved blade modeled after the original Mameluke sword given to him by Hamet. Its blade is inscribed with his name and a commemoration of the Battle of Tripoli Harbor.[5]

                  Due to the Marines' distinguished record during this campaign, including the capture of the Tripolitan city of Derna after a long and dangerous desert march, Marine Corps CommandantArchibald Henderson adopted the Mameluke sword in 1825 for wear by Marine officers. After initial distribution in 1826, Mameluke swords have been worn except for the years 1859–1875 (when Marine officers were required to wear the U.S. Model 1850 Army foot officers' sword), and a brief period when swords were suspended during World War II. Since that time, Mameluke swords have been worn by Marine officers in a continuing tradition to the present day.[6]
                  I gave a Mamaluke Sword to a good friend, who did Spec ops in SE Asia in the late 50s. When I presented it to him, he was in his early 80s and in failing health. When I held it out, he was stunned. Marines are rarely at a loss for words (No shit Buckwheat), but he had none. He finally took it from my hands, looked at me through wet eyes, and managed to get out "Thank you".
                  Last edited by NRATC53; 02-25-2021, 09:47 AM.
                  Take a young person shooting.... Take 2 or more if you can...

                  Comment


                  • Aquabach
                    Aquabach commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Semper Fi

                  #12
                  Yup, every other nation paid those jackasses, we just went over, kicked their asses and sing songs about it. Yeah, those Navy Taxi drivers were ok too...LOL!
                  Last edited by NRATC53; 02-25-2021, 09:48 AM.
                  Take a young person shooting.... Take 2 or more if you can...

                  Comment

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