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5 things competitive shooting will teach you about gunfighting

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    5 things competitive shooting will teach you about gunfighting

    https://www.policeone.com/police-pro...t-gunfighting/

    One of the most effective ways to hone your gun handling and marksmanship skills is to become involved in competitive shooting

    I’ve always taught my students three fundamental concepts that they must understand and apply in order to be a successful gunfighter: gun handling, marksmanship, and mindset. Some may argue that one of these is more important than the other two. I have found that all three are equally important.

    The mindset portion of this can be refined in many different ways: books, seminars, hands-on training, etc. The gun handling and marksmanship portions can best be refined by actually doing them. The most effective way to hone the skills in these two portions is to become involved in competitive shooting.

    Here are the five most important things competitive shooting will teach you about gunfighting:

    1. Accuracy
    Accuracy matters most. Never compromise your speed for accuracy. If you are not able to hit what you shoot at, you will always lose a gunfight.

    2. Speed
    There are two things that should be done fast in a gunfight: the “draw stroke” and reloading.

    3. Shooting while moving
    Gunfights are not ten paces and turn. Moving and shooting should be almost always used in a gunfight.

    4. Shooting from cover
    There are wrong ways and right ways to shoot from cover in a gunfight. Shooting from cover is a skill often times given little thought. In some competitions you are penalized for leaving cover with an empty weapon.

    5. Safety
    Competition shooting promotes safety more than anything. In fact, if you violate any of the four core safety rules, you will be disqualified.

    Many Options
    There are many types of competitive shooting arenas out there nowadays. There is the United States Practical Shooting Association (USPSA), International Practical Shooting Confederation (IPSC), Precision Police Competition or Practical Police Competition (PPC), International Defensive Pistol Association (IDPA), and Multi-Gun (3 Gun) to name a few. Take the time to research each of these and find out which one is best suited for you. Each one of these sports has distinct benefits for working on gun handling and marksmanship.

    USPSA and IPSC are both known as “Practical Shooting” sports. IPSC is the oldest and largest practical shooting sport in the world, while USPSA is the regional version of that. Both sports often include the shooter moving and shooting at multiple targets. IDPA is also known as a practical shooting sport but it has an emphasis on concealed shooting. IDPA does not have as much “gaming” as USPSA or IPSC.

    When the USPSA/IPSC “game” hit the LE world years ago, many of us believed the running-n-gunning was a waste of time and carried no practical benefit in modern day gunfighting. In retrospect, it is clear that the naysayers (including me) just did not do the research on the sport. However, there are some elements of the sport that are not tactically sound.

    The sport is great for the benefits in gun handling and marksmanship, but not as a user guide on how to gunfight. The beautiful part about USPSA, IPSC, and IDPA is they have different divisions. You can carry a stock pistol and wear your duty belt or off-duty gear for the competition. Remember, train as you play.

    3 Gun has some of the same benefits as USPSA or IPSC. 3 Gun gives you the opportunity to compete with your pistol, your carbine, and your shotgun — all weapons that a normal patrol officer would work with every day. Again, different divisions allow you to shoot with stock guns if you would like to.

    PPC is a shooting sport geared toward marksmanship. Unlike USPSA or 3 Gun, PPC matches do not have strict time requirements. All matches are known by the shooter ahead of time so there are no surprise courses of fire like other shooting sports. I have found PPC to be the best competitive shooting sport to hone your handgun marksmanship skills.

    If you are a first-time competitive shooter you may want to watch a match before you get your feet wet. Sometimes the match structures and rules can be confusing and overwhelming to new shooters. Watching other shooters can also be beneficial to picking up a few new techniques for your tool bag. Shoot well, gunfighters!
    Steve

    #2
    Interesting.
    I don't shoot in competitions, but have competed in schools and classes for awards/trophies and swag (and bragging rights, of course). One very important aspect of gunfighting is not mentioned; moving targets. Seldom is the human target standing still.
    "The Open Carry guy is my decoy."

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Dan 0351 View Post
      Interesting.
      One very important aspect of gunfighting is not mentioned; moving targets. Seldom is the human target standing still.
      True, but we do occasionally use swinging targets, and Texas stars. It teaches alot more useful experience than shooting touching holes in a sheet of paper while stationary.

      I do disagree with calling competitors gunfighters. Until you've been in a gunfight, you ain't a gunfighter.
      Steve

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        #4
        Competion shooting and real life shoot outs are 2 different animals. Neither is good training for one another.

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          #5
          Competition teaches you one very important thing. When the libtards say "why didn't the police just shoot the gun out of his hand instead of shooting him in the chest" you know they are as full of shit as a Christmas turkey.
          Give peace a chance, I'll cover you in case that doesn't work out.

          LIBERALISM should be classified as a MENTAL DISORDER!

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by LazyLab View Post
            Competion shooting and real life shoot outs are 2 different animals. Neither is good training for one another.
            While I agree comp shooting is a game, and there is no one shooting back at you, I think it does teach skills that could come in handy during a gunfight. Boxing and wrestling are also "games", and long before MMA, I've seen wrestlers fuck up guys much bigger than themselves.

            More than a couple of current and retired LEO's participate in local matches. I'm not going to say that I speak for/ have spoken to a majority of them, but it's been said by more than one that they've learned something doing comps, that they didn't learn in their respective academies. Don't you think shooting comps on occasion will keep their skills sharper than annual "requals" that consist of a box or two of poking holes in paper?
            Steve

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              #7
              I am interested in honing my skills anyone want to go upstate and have a real life challenge?? say 9mm ?????????? lol

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                #8
                That's my philosophy when shooting matches. Don't care about time, but do care about shot placement.
                SHADAP VARMINT!

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                  #9
                  Thats it I'm buying a STI open gun for a BUG. has anyone seen a good ankle holster for it?

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                    #10
                    For some other tips on gun fighting, try paintball or airsoft. It's not ideal but people are shooting back at you and you realize very quickly you don't need to expose yourself very much to put rounds on the target.
                    I'm not equating these games to a real gunfight, nothing can compare, but if you want to know what it's like to get shot at and it hurts when you get hit.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Rrudo74901 View Post
                      For some other tips on gun fighting, try paintball or airsoft. It's not ideal but people are shooting back at you and you realize very quickly you don't need to expose yourself very much to put rounds on the target.
                      I'm not equating these games to a real gunfight, nothing can compare, but if you want to know what it's like to get shot at and it hurts when you get hit.
                      MDTS will be doing Force on Force Pistol classes starting the end of this year. Looking forward to this.
                      Brandon

                      NRA LIFE | SAF | UT / NH / FL / CT / NY CCW | RSO | FREEPORT R&R

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I think competition, if anything, lets you do some gun control and pressure. Sure the pressure is different from someone actually shooting at you but hey you get to have some stress placed on yourself and it does affect how you handle it. It's a game yes... but just as in any game a little bit of pressure is on you to do your best and not flub it up.

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                          #13
                          One thing it will teach you for sure is that you gear works or it doesn't. I've seen it many times over the years, people with guns they've fired countless thousands of rounds through with nary a hiccup. But once they try to use them "at speed" they start to choke.

                          Me, I don't "train", I don't practice, I just shoot because I enjoy it.
                          Dear Buddha, please bring me a pony and a plastic rocket.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Not sure, but if there is Evil to fight , your servant is in for the fight

                            ... is that Evil?
                            Attached Files

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Normally I would say "Well I shot in 37 matches this year and zero gun fights, so I'm pretty sure which one is "real life"." But this year I've shot in just as many matches as gun fights and evil is to blame for sure.
                              Dear Buddha, please bring me a pony and a plastic rocket.

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