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Negligent Discharge, One Dead

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  • spider
    started a topic Negligent Discharge, One Dead

    Negligent Discharge, One Dead

    The stupid is strong here. I was fifty feet away when it happened. I know all the people involved. I just can't believe how dumb this was. On Mother's Day a woman lost her kid.






    Show Transcript

    KEENE, N.H. — A man is facing manslaughter charges for shooting and killing his friend in what he said was an accident, police said.
    Adam Anderson, 25, is charged with manslaughter in connection with the death of Holden Guyette, 22. Guyette was shot Sunday in a home on Washington Street in Keene and later died.



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    Anderson pleaded not guilty Monday.
    "This is a horrible tragedy, but it was an accident," defense attorney Alex Parsons said.
    Anderson called 911 Sunday and reported that he had accidentally shot his friend in the chest, police said. The only witness was the victim's sister, who is also Anderson's girlfriend, police said.
    Parsons said there was no dispute, and no one had been drinking or doing drugs.
    "Adam did not believe the firearm to be loaded, and he certainly did not intend to shoot or harm anyone," Parson said.
    Prosecutors called the act reckless, saying Anderson told police that he aimed the gun at Guyette and pulled the trigger without checking to see if it was loaded.
    If Anderson is able to post bail, he must be electronically monitored and was ordered to not have any contact with the victim's family.




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  • NRATC53
    replied
    Originally posted by Aquabach View Post

    You're foggy brained anyway.

    You have to grieve for the loss but not blame yourself for things beyond your control. You need to focus on the logic of that and fight the emotion.
    The parable of the two wolves raging inside each of us is a good example.

    You do know that story right?
    In case not, here it is. It's a good one.

    A grandfather is talking with his grandson and he says there are two wolves inside each of us which are always at battle.

    One is a good wolf which represents things like kindness, bravery, and love.
    The other is a bad wolf, which represents things like greed, hatred, and fear.


    The grandson stops and thinks about it for a second then he looks up at his grandfather and says,
    “Grandfather, which one wins?”


    The grandfather quietly replies, “The one you feed.”

    This is a fight between two different wolves in your brain.
    One is healthy grief and sorrow.
    The other is rotting guilt and self flagellation.
    The first is healing. The other is rot.
    The first can be used to help others as well as yourself.
    The other just causes more pain.

    Feed the right one
    Yeah, that

    Leave a comment:


  • NRATC53
    replied
    Originally posted by spider View Post

    That's the inner game! How do we process the loss and not eat ourselves up. Sometimes I get a little foggy brained from the adrenaline hangover.
    "Foggy brained"? as in your every day state? Yes, I'm back to being myself, but the phone's still on

    Leave a comment:


  • NRATC53
    replied
    Originally posted by Aquabach View Post

    It's not an inner game. But it is hard. NRATC53 is right. I have a feeling he's lived it.
    It will eat you up.
    Don't bottle it up. Don't repress it. Talk about it. Use your intellect over your emotion.
    I'm not saying it's easy. But going down that path will just make things worse.
    Yes I have..Too many times. .Still haunts my head from time to time- It sucks when you were unable to stop something in time. Hardest thing of all to deal with is having lived when you shouldn't have, and others should have but didn't. I've seen it get the best of people, leads to a bad place. Best thing you can do is talk about it to express your frustration. My phone's on, you know the number

    Leave a comment:


  • Aquabach
    replied
    Originally posted by spider View Post

    That's the inner game! How do we process the loss and not eat ourselves up. Sometimes I get a little foggy brained from the adrenaline hangover.
    You're foggy brained anyway.

    You have to grieve for the loss but not blame yourself for things beyond your control. You need to focus on the logic of that and fight the emotion.
    The parable of the two wolves raging inside each of us is a good example.

    You do know that story right?
    In case not, here it is. It's a good one.

    A grandfather is talking with his grandson and he says there are two wolves inside each of us which are always at battle.

    One is a good wolf which represents things like kindness, bravery, and love.
    The other is a bad wolf, which represents things like greed, hatred, and fear.


    The grandson stops and thinks about it for a second then he looks up at his grandfather and says,
    “Grandfather, which one wins?”


    The grandfather quietly replies, “The one you feed.”

    This is a fight between two different wolves in your brain.
    One is healthy grief and sorrow.
    The other is rotting guilt and self flagellation.
    The first is healing. The other is rot.
    The first can be used to help others as well as yourself.
    The other just causes more pain.

    Feed the right one

    Leave a comment:


  • ANYGUNWILLDOIFUWILLDO
    replied
    Originally posted by Synner View Post

    I’m sorry you lost a potential sale but I’m glad they walked out. I hope they learned something from it.
    No idiots like that learn only to go to another shop! Real shame

    Leave a comment:


  • spider
    replied
    Originally posted by Aquabach View Post

    It's not an inner game. But it is hard. NRATC53 is right. I have a feeling he's lived it.
    It will eat you up.
    Don't bottle it up. Don't repress it. Talk about it. Use your intellect over your emotion.
    I'm not saying it's easy. But going down that path will just make things worse.
    That's the inner game! How do we process the loss and not eat ourselves up. Sometimes I get a little foggy brained from the adrenaline hangover.

    Leave a comment:


  • Aquabach
    replied
    Originally posted by spider View Post

    It's hard to play that inner game.
    It's not an inner game. But it is hard. NRATC53 is right. I have a feeling he's lived it.
    It will eat you up.
    Don't bottle it up. Don't repress it. Talk about it. Use your intellect over your emotion.
    I'm not saying it's easy. But going down that path will just make things worse.

    Leave a comment:


  • spider
    replied
    Originally posted by NRATC53 View Post

    Don't let yourself get caught up in the "If onlys" No good comes from that
    It's hard to play that inner game.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRATC53
    replied
    Originally posted by spider View Post

    Love you, Brother.
    Don't let yourself get caught up in the "If onlys" No good comes from that

    Leave a comment:


  • spider
    replied
    Originally posted by NRATC53 View Post

    Yeah, that "Ohnosecond", where you know what's coming but can't stop it. Know the feeling.
    Love you, Brother.

    Leave a comment:


  • HabsFan
    replied
    Sorry you had to experience this Spider. My condolences.

    I know what I am talking to my kids about tonight!

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan 0351
    replied
    Originally posted by spider View Post

    The house is diagonal to mine. I was out walking the dogs, maybe 50' away, probably less. I never heard the round go off, but all of a sudden I had five police cruisers on my toes and I was directing officers into the building as they arrived. Everybody had their guns out. The fire station is around the corner. It took the EMT's an extra 30 seconds to get there. It just comes up from your feet like a tornado or a whirlwind.
    Damn...

    Leave a comment:


  • NRATC53
    replied
    Originally posted by spider View Post
    The hardest part for me is that I couldn't stop it from happening.
    Yeah, that "Ohnosecond", where you know what's coming but can't stop it. Know the feeling.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRATC53
    replied
    Originally posted by spider View Post
    How do you "teach" safety without checking to see if the gun is loaded? Isn't that the first lesson?
    Yes it is

    Leave a comment:

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