Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Camera Lens Advice

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #46
    This lens question is more complex then “I’m getting my first gun what should I get?” Lol

    Comment


      #47
      I if you know what you want and would like to save sales tax order from Allen’s in PA. https://allenscamera.com/cameras/

      Comment


        #48
        Originally posted by Dan 0351 View Post
        . . . I can't imagine trying to hold a 3000mm lens steady, even on a tripod. I would think the tripod would need to be decent+++ . . .
        The front of this camera does a nose dive when the lens is fully extended. However, at around 3 pounds, it is manageable without a tripod. That aside, I take the majority of my wildlife photos sitting in one spot (often for hours) and waiting for nature to pass by - a tripod will help me when I need to leave the camera to take a pee!

        Comment


          #49
          Originally posted by OddJob1776 View Post

          My 300mm is fine for waterfowl and other birds. However, when I try to photograph reptiles and amphibians, they usually see or "hear" me before I get close enough for a good picture.

          Is $300.00 too little to spend?
          Cameras/lenses are like AR15's. There are $300 AR's and $4,000 AR's. Cost, style, weight, accessories, purpose, etc. are all up to the individual.

          Here's an example:
          20190917_233221.jpg
          20190917_233008.jpg

          One of these lenses is a fixed 300mm and the other a 35-270mm. Which one is which? Why would you use one over the other. What are the pros/cons of each?
          Generally speaking, the lower the f-stop, the more $$$. This will let in more light and help taking crisp images easier.

          Basically, for me, the more $$$ I spend, the higher ratio of good images I get. But, like the guy with the $300 AR that can shoot circles around the well-to-do guy with the $4k AR, money is not a great substitute for skill set.

          If $300 for a lens is what you have - fine. It's on the extreme low end, but if you really learn how to use it, it will be enough - for a while.....

          "The Open Carry guy is my decoy."

          Comment


            #50


            Originally posted by Dan 0351 View Post

            Cameras/lenses are like AR15's. There are $300 AR's and $4,000 AR's. Cost, style, weight, accessories, purpose, etc. are all up to the individual.

            Here's an example:
            20190917_233221.jpg
            20190917_233008.jpg

            One of these lenses is a fixed 300mm and the other a 35-270mm. Which one is which? Why would you use one over the other. What are the pros/cons of each?
            Generally speaking, the lower the f-stop, the more $$$. This will let in more light and help taking crisp images easier.

            Basically, for me, the more $$$ I spend, the higher ratio of good images I get. But, like the guy with the $300 AR that can shoot circles around the well-to-do guy with the $4k AR, money is not a great substitute for skill set.
            If $300 for a lens is what you have - fine. It's on the extreme low end, but if you really learn how to use it, it will be enough - for a while.....
            Great example Dan, this is why Madison Avenue is so effective, ads place the idea in your head that if you buy this product your going to do great or be a better person , Buy the Nikon Flagship model and you will have photos like a National Geographic photographer.........lol sure if you have some training and a few years of experience under your belt.

            Comment

            Working...
            X