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    Need Computer Help

    My personal PC has been experiencing random shutdowns for quite a while...no blue screen or message, just instantly shuts down and reboots. It used to happen about 1x per week, so I wasnt in a rush to get it fixed. Event Viewer labels the critical error as "Event 41, Kernel-Power". The other day I Googled it and found some articles listing possible fixes, first of which was updating drivers. After that it is now happening 2x per day. Any idea what hardware item would be causing it? Power supply, Hard drive, ...? I'd rather just swap something out than continue to deal with the issue or fuck with it, but I dont want to replace something that is not the issue. I dont get how the fucking pc doesnt tell you what specificly generated the power fault

    #2
    check the power supply and clean out the pc it self ( to much dust on the cpu fan can cause over heating and shut downs )

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      #3
      Originally posted by Fandj View Post
      check the power supply and clean out the pc it self ( to much dust on the cpu fan can cause over heating and shut downs )
      THIS^^^^^

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        #4
        I blow it out pretty regularly. This morning i actually removed the ram and video card, blew it all out, and reseated everything. Maybe it helps this time, we will see.

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          #5
          How old is it? Manufacturer?

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            #6
            How old is the PC? Updates can make things intentionally worse forcing you to buy a new computer.
            Exercise the Bill of Rights. It's good for your Constitution.

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              #7
              Is this thing running 24/7 or only when you need to use it? Swapping out the power supply is the easiest and cheapest thing to do, depending if it is proprietary or not. Do not skimp on the wattage. Or the brand/cost.

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                #8
                I dont get how the fucking pc doesnt tell you what specificly generated the power fault
                It does, just not in a user friendly way.

                It's easier to help if you let us know what PC/OS you have, but in general, Start>Run>Event Viewer

                Under Windows Logs>System, you should have a list of events, and should see your Event ID 41 along with the date/time of a crash. When you click on it, you get more info at the bottom.

                That's the part that tells the specifics, and there's basically only 3 scenarios for this error.

                1) It says "bug check" with a hex value. This is a software/firmware issue causing a crash. Drivers and software updates are the solution, but it can be a bigger pain in the ass (Disk checks, OS repair, etc). It can also potentially be related to a bad HDD or RAM.
                2) The value for "PowerButtonTimestamp" isn't "0". That means the power button was held down until the PC restarted. You might have a broken power button, loose connection, short, etc. This is the best case scenario, easiest/cheapest fix.
                3) The value for PowerButtonTimestamp is "0", and there's no bug check values. That means it wasn't a bug, or your power button, so it's most likely a power supply issue. Either your PSU has some sort of issue, or the power strip/plug is having an intermittent loss (like a switched outlet, or a power drop when a big appliance kicks on)

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by RayK-47 View Post

                  It does, just not in a user friendly way.

                  It's easier to help if you let us know what PC/OS you have, but in general, Start>Run>Event Viewer

                  Under Windows Logs>System, you should have a list of events, and should see your Event ID 41 along with the date/time of a crash. When you click on it, you get more info at the bottom.

                  That's the part that tells the specifics, and there's basically only 3 scenarios for this error.

                  1) It says "bug check" with a hex value. This is a software/firmware issue causing a crash. Drivers and software updates are the solution, but it can be a bigger pain in the ass (Disk checks, OS repair, etc). It can also potentially be related to a bad HDD or RAM.
                  2) The value for "PowerButtonTimestamp" isn't "0". That means the power button was held down until the PC restarted. You might have a broken power button, loose connection, short, etc. This is the best case scenario, easiest/cheapest fix.
                  3) The value for PowerButtonTimestamp is "0", and there's no bug check values. That means it wasn't a bug, or your power button, so it's most likely a power supply issue. Either your PSU has some sort of issue, or the power strip/plug is having an intermittent loss (like a switched outlet, or a power drop when a big appliance kicks on)
                  Option 3, everything is zero, at least in the details for the critical error.

                  There are two PC's plugged into the same powerstrip, and the issue is only affecting one of them.

                  It's a Dell, Windows 10 up to date, fairly higher end gaming PC, I guess about 2 years old

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by BillyBonds View Post
                    I blow it out pretty regularly. This morning i actually removed the ram and video card, blew it all out, and reseated everything. Maybe it helps this time, we will see.
                    Yeah, that's typically a hardware component, bad RAM, Video card or overheating CPU. In the interest of troubleshooting on the cheap, you might try removing the CPU heatsink and re-applying thermal paste if its an older CPU. That can dry out over time and increase heat overload. And maybe reduce number of ram sticks to the bare minimum and see if you can isolate any bad sticks. Most motherboards have a downloadable utility to monitor your temps, that could help diagnose if its a temp issue.

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                      #11
                      when you get the new drivers, you might have to delete the old ones, then reboot and use the new ones to install after the reboot.
                      Last edited by 100MPG; 01-12-2021, 01:52 PM.
                      Originally posted by ChiefSailer
                      Deplorables FTW!!

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                        #12
                        Had a similar problem with mine. Turned out to be the power button going bad. The repair place replaced the power button, and all was well. The power button has it's own little circuit board which controls the starting up the computer. May not be that easy for you, but it was only a $20 fix for me.
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                          #13
                          Originally posted by BillyBonds View Post
                          ...I dont get how the fucking pc doesnt tell you what specificly generated the power fault
                          In a commercial server computer, you have multiple power supplies, and separate monitoring hardware that logs the status of all of the hardware and can catch such things. If one power supply fails, the second (or third or fourth...) power supply continues to keep you running while you can collect data about the failure. Unless you happen to have all of those power supplies plugged into a single power strip and the breaker trips when one fails. So, you'd want at least two power circuits feeding such a beast as well.

                          In your PC, everything is logged by the operating system. If you pull the ONE plug (which is what a dying power supply is doing), it never has the chance to log anything. It's lights out, and that's that. Then again, a failing power switch could turn it off in the same way (again, because your PC just isn't that smart, since it is made as cheaply as possible), and a failing hard drive would appear the same, since after the computer loses the ability to write to the drive, it loses the ability to record a log of the failure. And for that matter, a problem with the software (driver) controlling your hard drive would have the same symptoms.

                          Of all of these possibilities, the most likely scenario is a failing power supply. I had this exact issue happening to me over the summer. Failing power supplies tend to become less reliable as they heat up, which is also why cleaning them of dust will appear to help (since dust interferes with cooling). It's also a cheap fix.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by 100MPG View Post
                            when you get the new drivers, you might have to delete the old ones, then reboot and use the new ones to install after the reboot.
                            I have driver booster, ran it the other day to update all the drivers, and thats when it went from once every few day to 2x a day.

                            So far so good since this morning, but thats not saying anything, it would have to run smooth for a couple weeks before I felt confident that I had fixed the issue.

                            I dont know if this changes anything in the diagnosis, but when I check event viewer, there are no errors prior to the reboot, everything is after fact related to not being properly shut down.

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                              #15
                              Originally posted by BillyBonds View Post
                              ...when I check event viewer, there are no errors prior to the reboot...
                              Like I said above, once it dies, it loses the ability to record the event.

                              If you take it to a shop, they're going to have to change parts until it works. And since your problem is intermittent, it will have to sit on the bench for days to be sure it's fixed. They might have the advantage of having a similar system with "doner" parts they could salvage, so they can change multiple things until they zero in on the actual issue.

                              I'd suggest you swap out the power supply first. It's got to be under $30, and it's a 10 minute job.

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