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    Central Air Question

    Having central air put in the 1st and 2nd floor. One company said to go with (1) 5 ton unit for both floors the other said a 3 ton unit for the 1st floor and a 2 ton unit for the 2nd floor(slightly smaller than the 1st floor). I’m assuming the separate units is better but don’t know enough about central air so I’m leaving it up to the expert advise of all you deplorables. Thanks in advance

    #2
    I am miles from being an expert in this area, but have you considered several mini-splits throughout the house instead of a conventional central system? Over the years we’ve had assorted issues with our central, I regret not doing the mini-splits with a heat pump now.
    Ductless, super efficient and custom control in rooms/areas without having to run the main system.

    Just a thought to consider

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Huntington Guy View Post
      I am miles from being an expert in this area, but have you considered several mini-splits throughout the house instead of a conventional central system? Over the years we’ve had assorted issues with our central, I regret not doing the mini-splits with a heat pump now.
      Ductless, super efficient and custom control in rooms/areas without having to run the main system.

      Just a thought to consider
      I would do them in the whole house but the wife doesn’t like the way they look........ I agree with the problems of central air

      Comment


        #4
        Also, the 5 ton is a carrier system unk SEER rating I can find out though and the 2 ton and 3 ton units are RHEEM with 13 SEER ratings.

        Comment


          #5
          The negative of one zone is you’re cooling the whole house anytime you have it on... whether you want or not. Find out if the two zone layout will eat up more ducting space and where they plan to put it.
          Exercise the Bill of Rights. It's good for your Constitution.

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            #6
            2 systems will cost a lot more than 1 and Carrier suck

            Comment


              #7
              I have one zone for heat and AC. In the summer I close the vents downstairs and super cool the upstairs. I do the reverse in the winter.

              Comment


                #8
                I cool 2100 sq feet with a 3 tonne unit. It was 3.5, the new one is smaller.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by FastPhil View Post
                  2 systems will cost a lot more than 1 and Carrier suck
                  What’s a good unit? I’ve been reading about Rheem and most of the reviews haven’t been great. The model being offered is this one:
                  https://www.gemaire.com/rheem-ra1336...le-ra1336aj1na

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I’m currently looking into a Bosch BOVA 60 to replace my 5 ton Lennox. Much newer technology and only draws 2-11 amps at full output. It’s a heat pump , but it also uses conventional boiler water when below 5 degrees outside. SEER rating of about 18 and super quiet (59db). Someone told me that 14 SEER will be the minimum allowed for rebates. Output is programable, 2-5 tons, depending on requirements. Seems to have numerous advantages. Prices are even lower than conventional units.
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                      #11
                      I’d go with 2 units. One can go down and you still have the other running. I’ve got 2 units and in the past I’ve had the main floor unit Break down and still had the upstairs nice and frosty.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by LazyLab View Post
                        I’d go with 2 units. One can go down and you still have the other running. I’ve got 2 units and in the past I’ve had the main floor unit Break down and still had the upstairs nice and frosty.
                        Ya I think I’m going with the 2 units, but I’m pretty sure the model he’s offering is a discontinued model. Also it’s 13 SEER and I’m reading now most minimum requirements are 14 SEER.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Chiming in here.

                          As others have mentioned Carrier and Rheem is ok, Lennox usually regarded higher, Trane and Goodman are somewhere in between there, but it also depends on the model/series (and you'll get a lot of differing answers based on brand loyalty as you will with trucks or chainsaws or anything). Service impacts greatly...it's easier to get parts/service for a Rudd/Rheem for instance.

                          I have a Rheem classic for my one main zone (first floor and 2nd floor loft) and have no problem running a one zone for the main living area of the house (that one floor is roughly 2,500sq ft). My lower level (we're burried in a hillside, so it looks like a ranch but there's a whole 'nother floor which you can call the basement but really isn't) doesn't require that much cooling (more dehumidication) but a split unit solved that problem well.

                          So you can consider a strategically placed zone, and then supplement a naturally cooler or less used but insulated area with a split--that's ideal. As mentioned consider the layout/extra hassle of the duct runs in each proposal.


                          Comment


                            #14
                            You are going to spend a lot more money running 2 compressors and 2 air handlers electricity wise. Although there is something to say for redundancy with having two, if the upstairs AC goes out and you have to sleep in 90 degree temps, you are going to be pissed off anyways. In the long haul, your going to save a lot more money running a single compressor and air handler although it may take a few days to get the house to a minimum comfort level humidity and temperature wise.

                            My vote is a single 5 ton unit with separate zone controls for upstairs and downstairs ducted zones.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              When I did mine about 7 -8 years ago, 13 seer was the best you can get (10 seer I believe was the "norm" at the time) without overspending on a 16 seer or greater that would cost too much for the return it provided. Doing some Google-fu, 14 seer is the minimum required today. That 13 seer system he is probably getting a crazy deal on and not passing the savings onto you. Just my hunch. Get some more quotes would be my advice. With Central AC, I learned the hard way, buy once cry once.......every 10-20 years anyway. I can't believe my system is almost 10 years old. Do your research and get plenty of quotes...if possible, try to get references aside from what the company gives you.
                              Last edited by Diesel1; 07-11-2018, 10:50 AM.

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