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May 19-20 WWII Weekend at The Museum of American Armor, Old Bethpage Billage

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    #16
    Definitely going. Been to the Museum of American Armor a few times, but never to this event.

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      #17
      Originally posted by LazyLab View Post
      Is this Rain or Shine? Looking at weekend weather and wondering.
      I’m not sure yet. Will be confirming with museum and post here closer to the weekend

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        #18
        Any Sherman tank live fire on the 76mm gun?
        Know your rights/Refuse peacefully to consent to a search /Ask if you are free to go or are being detained/Even if you are not doing anything wrong the 4th Amendment protects you against unreasonable searches/Never say anything to law enforcement even if you think it will help you/If questioned clearly and unequivocally request that you would like to have an attorney present and defer any questions until then/Never go to prison because you are afraid to go to jail.

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          #19
          Ugh... of course I'll be halfway across the country this weekend.
          Awesome little museum. Really cool hardware all around.
          A sunny day
          A shotgun and a Chevrolet
          Wouldn't you like that?

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            #20
            Originally posted by class3 View Post
            Any Sherman tank live fire on the 76mm gun?
            only the hellcat has a live gun with intact breech. I'm certain they will put a few blank rounds down for crowd effect

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              #21
              Originally posted by class3 View Post
              Any Sherman tank live fire on the 76mm gun?
              Sometimes Sherman, most of the times Hellcat. They fire 50 cal. sometimes too. It is all depends what guns are operational on the day of event. GI reenactors will probably do German trenches assault, as usual too.

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                #22
                I wanna bring my nephew.

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                  #23
                  So far Sunday looks better weather wise.

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                    #24
                    Event is happening rain or shine

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by Russian View Post
                      http://museumofamericanarmor.com/

                      Come visit this event. See tanks, armored vehicles, blanks firing demonstrations, talk to reenactors. Fun and learning days for all ages. Stop by, say hello, take pictures.
                      Is there an hourly schedule for each day of the event? Nothing found at the museum site. The Scottish Games at Westbury Gardens had a schedule. It made it easier to know when various competitions etc where going to happen.
                      Exercise the Bill of Rights. It's good for your Constitution.

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by Barnslayer View Post

                        Is there an hourly schedule for each day of the event? Nothing found at the museum site. The Scottish Games at Westbury Gardens had a schedule. It made it easier to know when various competitions etc where going to happen.
                        Not that I know of. Usually it is morning flag raise ceremony. Then 2 times per day US reenactors, blank firing exhibitions. Between those, vehicles riding around the field with guests. My guess, because of the rain any schedule will be affected by it, also depends of amount of the visitors at the particular moment. Many reenactors/historians will do there own presentations at there tents. I do my own when group of people are approaching or people who I know are coming to visit. Another reason to stop by and say hello

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                          #27
                          Not for anything put if I was bringing vintage stuff I don’t know if I’d want it getting rained on and soaked. I’m sure you guys have some $$$$ invested. But I do hope those tanks shred that field up!!!!!!!

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by LazyLab View Post
                            Not for anything put if I was bringing vintage stuff I don’t know if I’d want it getting rained on and soaked. I’m sure you guys have some $$$$ invested. But I do hope those tanks shred that field up!!!!!!!
                            I'm sure that most valuable items will be stored in the tents or not at the display at all. At least half of the weapons are non-fireing, display only items. Most of us can't fit in authentic ww2 uniforms LOL (good life). Most of the uniforms are good reproduction. Real medals are in encased displays, small Items are under the tent anyways. I was told that a few years back, because of the rain, people were moved inside village buildings. Depending of weather kids dancing group is scheduled to come on Sunday.

                            Please wear appropriate footwear!

                            P.S. Some people are wearing real handguns on them. Because I display my to visitors they all are airsoft copy.
                            Last edited by Russian; 05-18-2018, 08:50 AM.

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                              #29
                              I went and had a great time.

                              I saw, and now want to buy, a spade mortar. I never knew a shovel could also launch explosives!


                              mortar1.jpg


                              http://www.smallarmsreview.com/display.article.cfm?idarticles=2226

                              When is a Spade Not a Spade? Soviet 37mm Spade Mortar
                              By Terry Gander

                              Any soldier soon learns that once the shooting starts in earnest one of the most important items of personal equipment is the entrenching tool. Not only is it essential for creating life-saving cover (or burying casualties), the soldier soon discovers it has many other uses. Apart from acting as an emergency skillet from time to time, it can also act as a very nasty and lethal weapon during close quarter combat; sharp-edged spades were often preferred rather than firearms during the trench raids of the Great War.

                              The entrenching tool has also found another not immediately apparent use, that of launching explosive packages at an enemy. This notion first appeared in the Soviet Union during the 1930s when someone (it has not yet been discovered whom) proposed that the steel handle of an entrenching tool could be converted into a light mortar barrel. This ingenious proposal was actually developed, manufactured and introduced into limited Soviet Army service during the late 1930s. The concept was simple. When required as a digging tool the tubular steel handle was held rigidly connected to the spade section by an internal steel shaft. Removing the shaft from the end of the handle resulted in a hollow steel tube that became the mortar barrel. The end of the smoothbore tube was hinged to the spade section, converting it into a recoil absorbing baseplate. The internal shaft could also act as a rudimentary monopod support for the barrel.

                              There is still much to learn regarding this odd little weapon, including what it’s service designation was. It is known that the barrel calibre was 37mm (1.45 inches), with a barrel length of 520 mm (20.47 inches). The complete contraption weighed 2.4 kg (5.3 pounds). The muzzle-loaded, drop-fired bomb (perhaps grenade would be a better term) weighed about 680 grams (1.5 pounds) and the maximum range was about 300 meters (328 yards).

                              All this data was taken from a German enemy equipment recognition manual dated July 1942, indicating that at least one example must have been captured by them and examined. It seems that the Germans did not know the Soviet designation either, giving it the reporting title of 3.7 cm Spatengranatwerfer 161(r). There the history of the 37mm Spade Mortar then seems to have ended for no indication of the device has been found recorded elsewhere other than the German manual (or at least I have never been able to find any). It seems more than likely that a small batch was issued for field trials just before the Germans invaded. The hard-pressed Soviets then found other more important things to manufacture, rather than what many soldiers must have regarded as little more than an ingenious military toy. The Spade Mortar faded from the scene.

                              It seemed that the Spade Mortar concept was dead, but it has recently reappeared. Once again the Russians are involved and to make the concept more acceptable for the current era, the projectile launched is a 40mm spin-stabilised grenade, the same type as launched from the GP-25 or GP-30 Kastyor grenade launchers slung under Kalashnikov series assault rifle barrels.

                              And, once again the correct name for this device is not certain - all I can find is the name Variant but my Russian is non-existent. The overall concept remains the same as before. Removing a shaft from the end of an entrenching tool handle converts the shaft into a short, internally rifled, grenade launcher barrel and the spade section folds to become a baseplate. It appears that the barrel is disconnected to allow a grenade to be inserted into the breech end before the barrel is connected again. Although it is not yet confirmed, the grenade is launched by smartly pulling the barrel down a short distance onto an internal firing pin - I could be wrong here. What appears to be a small drum-pattern sight can be inserted into the fixed section of the shaft below the barrel section. The complete equipment weighs 1.2 kg (2.65 pounds) complete.

                              The spin-stabilised grenades involved are the readily available 40mm VOG-25 and VOG-25P. Both obtain their propulsion from a charge venting through a ring of orifices in the grenade base. The VOG-25 has a direct impact fuze while the VOG-25P grenade is of the bounding variety. For the latter the impact fuze sets off a small charge which propels the grenade upwards a short distance before it detonates to scatter its lethal fragments over a radius of about 6 meters (nearly 20 feet). Maximum possible range is about 400 meters (437 yards).

                              The exact status of this present day grenade-launching entrenching tool is still uncertain, as are many other items concerned with this exploratory article, although it has been offered for export sales. Perhaps someone will be able to fill the gaps. In the meantime it is apparent that soldiers have found yet another use for the entrenching tool.
                              This article first appeared in Small Arms Review V6N8 (May 2003)
                              and was posted onli
                              ne on November 22, 2013

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                                #30
                                To say the truth it was very unpopular weapon for a number of reasons. It was quickly removed from army service and redeployed with partisans and saboteur groups.



                                DB4CB23B-EE4F-4854-8CC9-FF432994BB81.jpegA7A4C29F-8085-4357-8F17-BCD9688DA1EA.jpeg2EBFD0C1-4120-4AAF-9E81-AA8F1D398AEF.jpeg17BADDA9-82D2-434C-B43E-987B79F48D83.jpeg To
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                                Last edited by Russian; 05-20-2018, 09:24 PM.

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