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Early Type 99 Arisaka

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    Early Type 99 Arisaka

    Back to guns.
    So I didn’t have one of these and I don’t collect Japanese items, but I figured you have to have an Arisaka.

    This is an early war Type 99 series 1 manufactured at the Nagoya Army Arsenal around the time of Pearl Harbor. It has all the early features, monopod and anti-aircraft sights. As well, the Royal Mum is 100% intact and this rifle still has the bolt dust cover. Condition is 98% and hard to find like this. I can tell why the soldiers got rid of the dust covers as they rattle worse than old Diesel engine at idle. This is chambered in the oddball 7.7 Jap round (this is why I don’t collect Japanese shit). I will get some ammo for it but with the crack in the stock I’ll likely get another one to shoot. Interestingly the barrel is lined to stop corrosion from the ammo.

    enjoy

    Attached Files

    #2
    There were literally piles of these on the piers as guys were boarding ships to go home. I know two verterans personally who have them. My dad grabbed a Nambu pistol on the way out, but sold it on the train ride home.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Pat M View Post
      There were literally piles of these on the piers as guys were boarding ships to go home. I know two verterans personally who have them. My dad grabbed a Nambu pistol on the way out, but sold it on the train ride home.
      ‘Yes there are many out there. Most VFW halls have one on the wall.

      Comment


        #4
        Nice! Most of the rifles had the chrysanthemums shaved off by the Japanese troops. A close family friend has a paratrooper version that comes apart at the mid barrel band.

        Comment


          #5
          Nice!

          I have a few, but none in nearly as good condition. Ironically, someone just gave me another one on Monday, but it is in horrible condition. A bring-home that sat in a wet basement for many years. A project gun that will will cost 4X the value it will be worth when it's done!

          Congrats.

          I lost a shit-ton of Norma 7.7 Jap when hurricane Sandy came-a-knockin'. Didn't get to it in time....

          Interesting WiKi sidenote:

          There are conflicting claims that this was done on the orders of the Imperial Japanese Military prior to surrender, however it is generally accepted by most historians that the imperial chrysanthemums were ground off the rifles on the orders from General Douglas MacArthur, the commander of occupation forces at that time.[3] To date, no documentation from either Japanese or U.S. forces has been found that required the defacing.
          Last edited by Dan 0351; 06-13-2018, 07:29 PM.
          No Better Friend, No Worse Enemy

          - U.S. Marines

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Dan 0351 View Post
            Nice!

            I have a few, but none in nearly as good condition. Ironically, someone just gave me another one on Monday, but it is in horrible condition. A bring-home that sat in a wet basement for many years. A project gun that will will cost 4X the value it will be worth when it's done!

            Congrats.

            I lost a shit-ton of Norma 7.7 Jap when hurricane Sandy came-a-knockin'. Didn't get to it in time....

            I was was going to say we can shoot yours. I’ll get ammo. Nothing like shooting and old warhorse with a woodvstock.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Pat M View Post
              There were literally piles of these on the piers as guys were boarding ships to go home. I know two verterans personally who have them. My dad grabbed a Nambu pistol on the way out, but sold it on the train ride home.
              That's how my Dad got his Arisaka Carcano.
              Exercise the Bill of Rights. It's good for your Constitution.

              Comment


                #8
                Arisakas were the number #1 gun I saw rusting away in people's basements, when I used to do work in people's basements. lol The owners are all long gone now I'm sure.

                Funny how times change, not a great reputation and Norma ammo prices that were out of this world, for years the stores couldn't give one away. They'd sit in the rack for years. A box of ammo costing about 80% of what the rifles were selling for.

                Other sources of brass for reloading and the internet have really driven the prices up, shockingly so.

                I have two... a "sporterized" one that my father bought, why I have NO idea. I think he paid $108 (?) at the time. And a stock one, though ground, no monopod, no dust cover. I paid $46 for it. (from a gun store). The funny part to me is a few years before I bought a bayonet and I paid $35 or $40 for it, but only paid $6 more for the rifle.
                Last edited by cas; 06-13-2018, 08:22 PM.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by cas View Post
                  Arisakas were the number #1 gun I saw rusting away in people's basements, when I used to do work in people's basements. lol The owners are all long gone now I'm sure.

                  Funny how times change, not a great reputation and Norma ammo prices that were out of this world, for years the stores couldn't give one away. They'd sit in the rack for years. A box of ammo costing about 80% of what the rifles were selling for.

                  Other sources of brass for reloading and the internet have really driven the prices up, shockingly so.

                  I have two... a "sporterized" one that my father bought, why I have NO idea. I think he paid $108 (?) at the time. And a stock one, though ground, no monopod, no dust cover. I paid $46 for it. (from a gun store). The funny part to me is a few years before I bought a bayonet and I paid $35 or $40 for it, but only paid $6 more for the rifle.
                  Well what would you rather have? A high quality M1903A3 American made battle rifle, M1 Garand or K98 Mauser? Or a type 99 POS? Lol

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Waffen1974 View Post
                    Nice! Most of the rifles had the chrysanthemums shaved off by the Japanese troops. A close family friend has a paratrooper version that comes apart at the mid barrel band.
                    Actually, no

                    Originally posted by Dan 0351 View Post
                    Nice!

                    I have a few, but none in nearly as good condition. Ironically, someone just gave me another one on Monday, but it is in horrible condition. A bring-home that sat in a wet basement for many years. A project gun that will will cost 4X the value it will be worth when it's done!

                    Congrats.

                    I lost a shit-ton of Norma 7.7 Jap when hurricane Sandy came-a-knockin'. Didn't get to it in time....

                    Interesting WiKi sidenote:

                    There are conflicting claims that this was done on the orders of the Imperial Japanese Military prior to surrender, however it is generally accepted by most historians that the imperial chrysanthemums were ground off the rifles on the orders from General Douglas MacArthur, the commander of occupation forces at that time.[3] To date, no documentation from either Japanese or U.S. forces has been found that required the defacing.
                    Having spoken with many Asian Theater Vets, many of whom went on to serve in occupied Japan, the grinding off was done by US forces. It was said it was agreed as part of the surrender that the symbol of the Emperor would be removed before letting the rifles go, but I have found no official documents laying this out. Yes, there were warehouses full of these rifles, as well as Nambu pistols. GIs could take rifles after picking through them. They were stopped at the door where the Mum was ground off. I have a few examples with part and wholly ground Mums and the story was corroborated by the GIs I got them from. I also have some battlefield captures, also acquired from the GIs who did the capturing. Those rifles have their Mums intact. I also have one rifle recovered decades later from a cave in the Philippines- It is intact, but is now an artifact

                    That is a beautiful example of the Arisaka, they came in 6.5 and 7.7. Hornaday now makes the ammo, at 1/2 the cost of the Norma.
                    Take a young person shooting.... Take 2 or more if you can...

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Rrudo74901 View Post

                      Well what would you rather have? A high quality M1903A3 American made battle rifle, M1 Garand or K98 Mauser? Or a type 99 POS? Lol
                      That dust cover sure is noisy! After WWII, many Arisakas were converted to other calibers. I've seen them in .300 Savage and many others
                      Take a young person shooting.... Take 2 or more if you can...

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by NRATC53 View Post

                        That dust cover sure is noisy! After WWII, many Arisakas were converted to other calibers. I've seen them in .300 Savage and many others
                        What did they do? Ream the chamber and rebarrel them? The action isn’t that slick to do that.
                        Last edited by Rrudo74901; 06-14-2018, 06:10 AM.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I've got a sporterized 99.My dad bought it home from the Pacific as well as a Nambu pistol.Before he sporterized it,the 99 was intact.As kids we would use it to play "army".Put it on the monopod and called it a cannon.He sporterized it to use as a deer rifle in the mid '60's.I used it for deer hunting in my younger days,still a good shooter.The pistol ended up in the East river after he caught me and my brother loading up the magazine when I was around 9-10 yrs old.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Rrudo74901 View Post

                            What did they do? Ream the chamber and rebarrel them? The action isn’t that slick to do that.
                            The ones I saw were rebarrelled . The job was adequate, but not pretty on most, reflecting the skill of those that did them. The caliber was hand stamped on the barrel. With the large numbers of these rifles in circulation in Post war US, you can bet there were enough folks who said "Let's give it a try"

                            On a side note: After WWII, there were many GIs coming home with K98s, and many other rifles and other arms. My Grandfather owned a Sporting Goods store and bought many of these. If they were pre 1941 and complete in great condition, he paid $15 each for them and would convert them into sporting rifles, most times rebarrelling them, installing sporting or target sights sometimes with scope mounts etc and with hand made walnut stocks. I now have the last one he did, we bought it for my Dad and he left it to me
                            Take a young person shooting.... Take 2 or more if you can...

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by NRATC53 View Post

                              The ones I saw were rebarrelled . The job was adequate, but not pretty on most, reflecting the skill of those that did them. The caliber was hand stamped on the barrel. With the large numbers of these rifles in circulation in Post war US, you can bet there were enough folks who said "Let's give it a try"

                              On a side note: After WWII, there were many GIs coming home with K98s, and many other rifles and other arms. My Grandfather owned a Sporting Goods store and bought many of these. If they were pre 1941 and complete in great condition, he paid $15 each for them and would convert them into sporting rifles, most times rebarrelling them, installing sporting or target sights sometimes with scope mounts etc and with hand made walnut stocks. I now have the last one he did, we bought it for my Dad and he left it to me
                              The gentleman I bought a bunch of items from and has been collecting for 50 years told me his first rifle was a British Enfield. He rode the train into Boston and went to the hardware store and picked through the barrel of rifles and brought it home on the train and bus. And he paid $8.00 for it

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