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    Heinemann Rifle

    #firearms history #StG 44 #MP44 #facebook #social media #captured weapons #WWII #WW2 #gunblr









    Heinemann Rifle

    Designed by Karl Heinemann in the mid-1920s for Rheinmetall, the Rh.28 and Rh.29 Selbstlade Gewehre (self-loading rifles) were manufactured in Solothurn, Switzerland. This was due to restrictions placed on German arms manufacture following World War One.
    Heinemann’s rifle utilised the Bang system, a gas system which uses muzzle gases captured by a muzzle device to actuate the weapon’s action, developed by Søren Hansen Bang. Heinemann coupled the Bang system with a toggle lock which opened horizontally to the right of the receiver (see image #8). Unlike other toggle lock rifles like those developed by Luger, Pedersen or White, Heinemann’s system opened horizontally not vertically. Unlike the recoil system utilised by other toggle-lock rifles Heinemann’s rifle remained locked until gas pressure captured by the muzzle pulled a cam forward unlocking the breech and allowing breech gases to push the breech block rearwards.

    The rifle fed from the left via side-loading box magazines holding 5 or 10 rounds. Examples chambered in both US .276 Pedersen (for the 1929 trials) and German 7.92x57mm survive. The rifle was extremely complex and had 144 individual parts (see image #4).
    In August 1929, Heinemann’s rifle alongside designs from Colt, Czechoslovakia, Thompson, Pedersen and Garand were evaluated by the US Army. All but the last two designs were discounted after initial testing. The Ordnance Board report found that Heinemann’s rifle suffered from numerous shortcomings including: feeding and cooling problems, it was excessively heavy (weighing 9lbs 6 oz), had poor sights and the rifle’s overall function was poor.
    Walther/Heinemann Sporting Rifle (source)
    Rheinmetall made approximately 50 examples, while most of these were military pattern rifles some sporting models were also made, possibly as presentation guns. In the early 1930s Heinemann appears to have taken his design to Walther who manufactured some sporting rifles using his action. Unlike the earlier military rifles the Walther rifles had a smaller bottom-loading box magazine.
    Heinemann’s toggle-lock action combined with the Bang system made full-scale production of the rifles for military use too expensive. While the Bang system was later revisited with the Mauser and Walther G41s it was soon superseded by gas-operated systems.
    Sources:
    Images: 1-5 6 7 8
    Karl Heinemann’s Patents: 1 2 3 4
    Rifles of the World, J. Walter (1993)
    Hatcher’s Book of the Garand, J.S. Hatcher (1948)
    Walther/Heinemann Toggle Lock Sporting Rifle, ForgottenWeapons, (source)
    Welcome to Historical Firearms, a site that looks at the history, development and use of firearms, as well as wider military history

    #2
    Thanks for posting. Love this stuff.
    Hunter, NRA Life Member, NYS Deplorable

    🚄TrumpTrain2016🇺🇸.🇺🇸.🇺🇸

    Pro Political Term Limits
    Anti High Capacity Mag Limits
    Fuck Andrew Cuomo's Suck my Ass Act

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      #3
      Joe your the man ... Keep up the good work.
      There are two types of people in this world. People that think the Goverment is looking out for their best interest and people that just think !

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