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1768 Charleville Replica

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    1768 Charleville Replica

    Anyone own a flintlock? Thinking about getting this one.
    http://www.veteranarms.com/Reproduct...arleville.html

    #2
    that may be all you are legally able to own after the election

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      #3
      Bump! Jonesing on it! Lol

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        #4
        Originally posted by warmnfuzzy View Post
        that may be all you are legally able to own after the election
        Only AFTER you ground off the bayonet lug!

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          #5
          When I was actively reenacting the F&I War, Revolution, and War of 1812 I had a Pedersoli Brown Bess. As I was mostly a Redcoat it was the only musket we could have on the field when serving under the Union Jack. However, it was also correct for those damned Rebel units when we took the "other" side. And it was good to go for F&I on the British side (there was no "American" side in that War) and for either side in 1812.

          If you're buying it to reenact...consider which side you're on. The Charleville is good for portraying American or French, probably not correct, or allowed, for the Brit units in any war. And if you are doing Hessian, it won't work in those units....I forget what they use...but might allow a Bess.

          If you are buying it to actually shoot and want to hit something....don't buy it unless you like missing more than hitting. Remember its a smooth bore, shoots a .69 ball that bounces down the barrel half a dozen times before it leaves the muzzle, and the linear tactics used in the period were developed 'cause the guns were so inaccurate....so lots of balls down the field and the hope was someone would hit someone, sometime. For the Brits it was one volley and then the bayonet.

          If you are buying it to hit targets, or hunt, and want to stay in pre-1800 period I'd suggest a Penn. long rifle type or anything with rifling, but not a smoothbore. There are a bunch of makers out there. Pedersoli for factory made stuff and a lot of craftsmen who make em one at a time. For fur trade reenacting or Silly War (errr...war of northern aggression? Civil War? War to keep the Union whole?) there's a ton of both flintlock and percussion available.

          I had lots of fun with the Bess. About twice a year we'd actually load ball in it and blast away. It's humbling to be sure, especially if you're used to actually hitting what you aim at.

          Whatever you do, enjoy the gun. And remember, ya gotta clean it real, real soon after firing. There are a ton of recipes about what works best...I think I used Murphy's soap in boiling water, lots of brass brushes, a ton of patches, and some gun oil. It's a bit of a chore but we made it part of our camp life....and it always got cleaned again when we got home.

          God Save the King.






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            #6
            Thanks for the great reply, a lot of good info! I'm not looking to do anything with it other then once in a blue moon feel patriotic ant take a couple shots with it. I'm looking for a rifle used by the Continential Army or the Militias of the Colonies and that's why I'm leaning to this model.
            As far as which company to buy from, I've read a lot of positive stuff about the Pedersoli guns and some negatives on the India companies. Is this true? Hear they use pot metals and the Frisins are not hardened. Any websites or places you recommend?

            Thanks again, you Tory Loyalist!😂

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              #7
              There are (were?) two types of Bess rifles being imported...Japanese and Pedersoli. The Japanese models were not quite right in terms of stock and furniture, as I recall, the Pedersoli were correct. As far as Indian-made, I can't recall them or knew anyone who had one. I'd put them completely out of my mind unless all you want is an wall hanger. I mean black powder, a spark, unknown metals and your face and eyes....not a good combination.

              As far as places for more info....I'll have time later tonight (3-hours earlier here than there....errr, where you are) so look for it tomorrow.

              I found reenacting a ton of fun. Probably spent as much time reading/researching the Rev War (and the others) as actually in the field, but that was part of the attraction of the hobby. It was a wonderful way to learn and it is a family hobby...my wife was active and if I'd had young kids, they would have been as well. I spent most of my time serving a cannon....a 3 pounder. To say that was a blast is an understatement. There are a couple of units on LI...but if you are interested, don't feel constrained by the geography of where the unit is headquartered...most reenactments take place somewhere else and people come from all over the East (and mid-west) to participate. Find a unit that interests you (artillery, Highlanders, Hessians, the cursed Rebels, etc. and research them. It ain't a cheap hobby, but it a ton of fun.)

              More later.

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                #8
                Thanks 👍🏻

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                  #9
                  I was just going to ask where it was made. I assumed it was India... the guns that may or may not be designed to be fired.

                  I have a Pedersoli Mortimer and while the Italians still seem to struggle at times with proper metal hardness, despite 600 years of practice, I'd surely trust any of the Italian guns over the indian ones.
                  Dear Buddha, please bring me a pony and a plastic rocket.

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                    #10
                    I picked up a Lyman Great Plains flintlock in .50 cal several years ago, and have only had it out to the range a few times. Shooting it is a lot of fun, but there is a reason those guys carried pistols, daggers, swords, hatchets, etc......the thing only goes off half the time you pull the trigger. After tapping the rear sight over in the dove tail, and filing off about 1/8" off the front blade, I can keep the shots in the black on a 100 yd rifle target from the bench. Lots of fun, but a different type of shooting. Swabbing the bore between shots, misfires, and I get about 8 shots off in an hour. Washing out the bore with hot soapy water is different too.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by cas View Post
                      I was just going to ask where it was made. I assumed it was India... the guns that may or may not be designed to be fired.

                      I have a Pedersoli Mortimer and while the Italians still seem to struggle at times with proper metal hardness, despite 600 years of practice, I'd surely trust any of the Italian guns over the indian ones.
                      That's what I'm reading and seeing on video reviews also. Thanks

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Pat M View Post
                        I picked up a Lyman Great Plains flintlock in .50 cal several years ago, and have only had it out to the range a few times. Shooting it is a lot of fun, but there is a reason those guys carried pistols, daggers, swords, hatchets, etc......the thing only goes off half the time you pull the trigger. After tapping the rear sight over in the dove tail, and filing off about 1/8" off the front blade, I can keep the shots in the black on a 100 yd rifle target from the bench. Lots of fun, but a different type of shooting. Swabbing the bore between shots, misfires, and I get about 8 shots off in an hour. Washing out the bore with hot soapy water is different too.
                        What do you think causes the problems? The flint? Bad Spring?

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                          #13
                          Sometimes it doesn't spark. Sometimes I get a spark, but the powder in the pan does not ignite. Sometimes the powder in the pan ignites but does not set off the powder charge. It will go off eventually. If I was using it for hunting, I would definitely go with a percussion cap rifle. It could be that I need to order some better quality flints, and not the ones that are packaged by Lyman. I know that Track of the Wolf sells what they claim to be the best flints. It is definitely fun to shoot. The ignition is not instantaneous like a modern firearm. It's sort of a click-bang after you pull the trigger, then a nice smelly cloud of white smoke.

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                            #14
                            I can see the delay your talking about on some vids I've watched. Hearing that shape of flints play a big role? True? Do you make cartridges or just powder ,wad and ball?

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                              #15
                              I don't want to jinx myself, but I think my Mortimer has misfired ONCE. I had a T/C that misfired a bit more often, but I think that was more due to the cut agate "flints" I was using.

                              Using real quality flints, and real black powder, unless you do something silly or let it get real dirty, they're pretty reliable. If you try and use crappy or dull flint, and/or worse, BP substitutes, you're going to have problems. Some guns have hardness problems with the frizzen and won't spark well even with good sharp flint. Some guns have bad geometry and won't spark well either.

                              Of course you can't buy black powder locally, you'll have to order it. And order enough to be worth while. I use KIK 2F for my charge and Swiss Null B in my pan.
                              Last edited by cas; 08-24-2016, 08:51 PM.
                              Dear Buddha, please bring me a pony and a plastic rocket.

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