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Ruger 10/22 stovepipes... ugh...

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    #76
    Originally posted by sickofny View Post
    This may sound stupid but are all your magazines thoroughly cleaned? I have a 40+ year old 10/22 that always worked flawlessly but started giving me similar headaches a few years ago. I realized it was giving problems with certain magazines.
    Make sure the feed ramps in the magazines are completely clean. They will gum up with bullet lube and that keeps the rounds from rising up completely to be grabbed by the bolt. When it fed the round it sort of smashed them into the barrel face instead of chambering it. Cleaned all the mags intensively and the problem went away.
    Not stupid, but yes, for the reasons you mentioned, I cleaned all of the magazines before I did the experiment.

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      #77
      Originally posted by Huntington Guy View Post
      It would be interesting to know if the factory trigger group gives you the same malfunctions but why swap out the BX before sending to Ruger? It is a Ruger product, perfectly reasonable for you to get problem free operation from it, after all, they sell is as an upgrade to their factory installed trigger (which are meh at best).
      Just my opinion but I’d send it w the BX on board and have them make it right.
      I thoroughly cleaned the rifle again and swapped the factory trigger group back in this morning and repeated the experiment again exactly as I did yesterday. Same mags, same ammo. Out of 200 rounds, only got TWO stovepipes and that was with the Aguila 40gr CPRN. Decided to run another 50 rounds of the Aguila 40gr just to check and didn't have another single stovepipe. So, with the factory trigger group back in, I only got two stovepipes in 250 rounds. The only other variable is that I left the bolt and guide rod a little "wetter" than usual.

      I'm moving in the right direction but I don't really know what to make of the results. Maybe the additional lubrication had an affect, maybe it didn't. I can't see how the trigger group could make a difference unless the ejector in the factory trigger is slightly different spec than the BX or the magazine release plunger is holding the magazine in better. The one thing I have ruled out is the problem is not specific ammo.

      So now I will clean it again, swap the BX trigger back in, leave it wet again and try again but just with mini-mags and see if the problem comes back with the BX trigger. I know I should send it to Ruger and I probably will, but I can't help myself. I need to figure this out!!

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        #78
        Originally posted by Range Time View Post

        This is a good point. I always use rounds with copper plating to minimize lead fouling.
        Copper plating doesn't do all that much about lead fouling. It mostly looks pretty. 22LR is going to have lead scrape off no matter what the surface treatment, and in any case, copper fouling is worse than lead fouling.

        Originally posted by Range Time View Post

        My problem is I've never seen a patch come out CLEAN. So I'm either no t cleaning the barrels enough, using the wrong solvent, or just have fabulously dirty guns.
        You've got to spend more time cleaning then. Or be lazy and use a bore snake.

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          #79
          Is this a stock gun? Might be a barrel to receiver issue. Does barrel line up with receiver correctly? Any sagging of barrel? Did you check the V block and screws? Lose?

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            #80
            Originally posted by LazyLab View Post
            Is this a stock gun? Might be a barrel to receiver issue. Does barrel line up with receiver correctly? Any sagging of barrel? Did you check the V block and screws? Lose?
            Yes, stock except for the BX trigger. Everything else is nice and tight. I did a little more polishing of the interior of the receiver and I've swapped the ejector and magazine plunger from the OEM trigger group to the BX trigger. Back to the range for another test.

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              #81
              Originally posted by Volkosupply View Post

              I'm kind of inexperienced with working on these things......other than the back of a ruger bolt what am I looking at?

              -Vick
              Yes -- its upside down --
              NRA Instructor / RSO & NRA Life Member / S.A.F.E. Armorer / 03-FFL / Moist Nugget gun nut / Ammosexual / And a right wing Republican Jew with guns

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                #82
                Originally posted by rlitman View Post

                Copper plating doesn't do all that much about lead fouling. It mostly looks pretty. 22LR is going to have lead scrape off no matter what the surface treatment, and in any case, copper fouling is worse than lead fouling.

                So why do they plate all other handgun and rifle bullets?

                You've got to spend more time cleaning then. Or be lazy and use a bore snake.
                I do. Then a brush. Then solvent. Then two clean swatches. Then I repeat that at least five times. I used to do it even more times, but it never comes out clean anyway.

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                  #83
                  Back to the range this morning with 10 mags of CCI mini-mags and the BX trigger with the swapped parts back in. Got 1 stovepipe in 6 out of the 10 mags. Gun was cleaned and lubed but not left as wet as last time. So, now my thinking is that the trigger really has nothing to do with it and my last outing was better because the gun was better lubricated. I'm going to run this gun one last time with the OEM trigger back in (because I'm insane) and then it's going back to Ruger.

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                    #84
                    I should send my jammatic back also . Really takes the fun out of shooting it

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                      #85
                      Originally posted by HyFiveGuns View Post
                      Back to the range this morning with 10 mags of CCI mini-mags and the BX trigger with the swapped parts back in. Got 1 stovepipe in 6 out of the 10 mags. Gun was cleaned and lubed but not left as wet as last time. So, now my thinking is that the trigger really has nothing to do with it and my last outing was better because the gun was better lubricated. I'm going to run this gun one last time with the OEM trigger back in (because I'm insane) and then it's going back to Ruger.
                      Not insane, but very thorough. My hats off to ya. Ruger will also know this as well when you put all this in your letter to send in with the rifle. And then you will most likely have an extra free mag for the trouble, in its return.

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                        #86
                        Update: I bought and installed a KIDD guide rod / spring kit. The kit comes with a very fine machined guide rod and three recoil springs. I started with the standard tension spring and saw some improvement with 3 or 4 stovepipes per 100 rounds. Cleaned the gun again and installed the 10% lower tension spring and VOILA!!! Not a single stovepipe in 100 rounds. Being in disbelief, I ran another 100 rounds through. No stovepipes. Another 100 after that; no stovepipes. So, I think I may have solved the problem. Sure, it cost me some money and I think I let Ruger off the hook, but it does save me the hassle of packing it up and shipping it back.

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                          #87
                          Originally posted by HyFiveGuns View Post
                          Update: I bought and installed a KIDD guide rod / spring kit. The kit comes with a very fine machined guide rod and three recoil springs. I started with the standard tension spring and saw some improvement with 3 or 4 stovepipes per 100 rounds. Cleaned the gun again and installed the 10% lower tension spring and VOILA!!! Not a single stovepipe in 100 rounds. Being in disbelief, I ran another 100 rounds through. No stovepipes. Another 100 after that; no stovepipes. So, I think I may have solved the problem. Sure, it cost me some money and I think I let Ruger off the hook, but it does save me the hassle of packing it up and shipping it back.
                          Glad you got to the bottom of it. Your effort and determination got you there, congrats on that. I would’ve dropped it on Ruger long ago. I don’t remember if you said how old or new the rifle is but that isn’t something that should cause issues until you are many thousands of rounds through the gun.

                          Happy shooting 👍

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                            #88
                            Atta-Boy!! Good job.

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                              #89
                              Originally posted by Huntington Guy View Post

                              Glad you got to the bottom of it. Your effort and determination got you there, congrats on that. I would’ve dropped it on Ruger long ago. I don’t remember if you said how old or new the rifle is but that isn’t something that should cause issues until you are many thousands of rounds through the gun.

                              Happy shooting 👍
                              Thanks. The rifle is about 3 years old. I don't think the problem or the fix has anything to do with the age of the rifle or the round count. These receivers are cast aluminum and if you look at the top of my receiver from the inside, the finishing is horrible. There are some spots that look similar to what solder looks like when it drips. I have tried to sand/polish those down as much as my patience has allowed to get rid of the high spots, but I think the bolt stumbles on those machining marks. With the lighter recoil spring and sufficient lubrication, there is less resistance and it allows the bolt to "fly" over those marks, staying open longer to allow the shell to eject. I probably should've sent it back to Ruger, but I just didn't feel like it. At some point, I will try to really sand down the inside of the receiver, it's just very awkward and time consuming.

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                                #90
                                Originally posted by HyFiveGuns View Post
                                Update: I bought and installed a KIDD guide rod / spring kit. The kit comes with a very fine machined guide rod and three recoil springs. I started with the standard tension spring and saw some improvement with 3 or 4 stovepipes per 100 rounds. Cleaned the gun again and installed the 10% lower tension spring and VOILA!!! Not a single stovepipe in 100 rounds. Being in disbelief, I ran another 100 rounds through. No stovepipes. Another 100 after that; no stovepipes. So, I think I may have solved the problem. Sure, it cost me some money and I think I let Ruger off the hook, but it does save me the hassle of packing it up and shipping it back.
                                great job. I have that same guide rod/spring kit in the one I built. The three springs are what sold it for me.

                                And yeah, I could see sanding in there being awkward at best. Taking the barrel off may help. I"ve never taken one off, but putting it in is pretty straight forward.
                                High quality building supplies since 1948! Friendly FFL transfers of long guns, receivers, and ammunition. Feel free to call us at 516 741 4466

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