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Cleaning without Stripping (Various Rifles)

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  • 2wheelbliss
    replied
    Originally posted by Range Time View Post
    If you don't take the whole thing apart, the hardest part of cleaning is getting yourself set up and cleaned up. The process is relaxing, as long as you don't take literally the phrase, "...until the patch comes out clean."
    I think that was my problem when I first started. I went thru tons of patches and the patch still didn't come out clean. What constitutes as clean anyway. I've since kind of stopped when the patches had some little bit of discoloration then stopped. I don't like cleaning them but I know it's a necessary evil.
    I have a GSG too, haven't taken apart that sucker at all as it was too involved. I spray some CLP over anything I can reach run a bore snake thru it a few times and done.

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  • Postal Bob
    replied
    Originally posted by bigbore44 View Post
    Take your own pictures during disassembly.
    That and youtube are your best friend.

    Also, if you store your guns for a long time after shooting, you really should clean them after you shoot. Carbon buildup will attract moisture over time, which creates sludge and rust.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barnslayer
    replied
    Originally posted by FDEMTNYC View Post

    I used to use those reusable hospital cloth bed chucks, now I just use the disposable “wee wee pads”. You can get them by the case on amazon. When you’re done, roll up all the used patches and such and toss it.
    I reuse the towel. We keep a pile of old towels to use around the garage door if we expect rains heavy enough to overflow our drywell in the driveway. They get tossed into the laundry after that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barnslayer
    replied
    Originally posted by Range Time View Post

    Rifles might be different, but I have never disassembled my first 870, and it still runs great! I do remove the barrel, and I move the bolt around so that I can reach in to wipe the internals. Handguns are the same way. I've never disassembled any of them other than barrel, slide, spring.

    If you don't take the whole thing apart, the hardest part of cleaning is getting yourself set up and cleaned up. The process is relaxing, as long as you don't take literally the phrase, "...until the patch comes out clean."
    When I first got my 870 the action was stiff, not a smooth movement. I took the whole thing apart and polished the contact surfaces for the action. Now it's possible to work the pump with one hand just like the "experts" in Hollywood.

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  • Range Time
    replied
    Originally posted by Barnslayer View Post

    I’m not a fan of the boresnake. I bought one but then wondered about cleaning it. I use the traditional bronze brush, patches etc.
    For shotgun I use a one piece fiberglass rod for the brush and a wood dowel for the patch. It saves time of swopping rod attachments or needing two rods.
    Snakes are great! You can wash them with dish soap and water. I used to do it outside with the boss of a bucket. Now I do it in the bathroom sink because I don't have a slop sink. (Sorry environment!). Then I squeeze out the water and hang them in my basement to dry.

    I do agree that a rod in from the muzzle end will pull just the same. It might not go as quickly, but there is no cleanup since you just throw the patches away.
    Last edited by Range Time; 03-12-2020, 09:51 PM.

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  • Range Time
    replied
    Originally posted by HulkSmash22 View Post

    I'm gonna have to bite the bullet. I hate working with small pieces. Always afraid of losing something or fucking it up.
    Rifles might be different, but I have never disassembled my first 870, and it still runs great! I do remove the barrel, and I move the bolt around so that I can reach in to wipe the internals. Handguns are the same way. I've never disassembled any of them other than barrel, slide, spring.

    If you don't take the whole thing apart, the hardest part of cleaning is getting yourself set up and cleaned up. The process is relaxing, as long as you don't take literally the phrase, "...until the patch comes out clean."

    Leave a comment:


  • SemiAutoFetish
    replied
    Originally posted by Rrudo74901 View Post
    Not to be a snob but shoot the hi point until it jams and throw it away. Just sayin
    BTW....they have a GREAT warranty policy on these they'll take pretty much anything back!

    Leave a comment:


  • Rrudo74901
    replied
    Not to be a snob but shoot the hi point until it jams and throw it away. Just sayin

    Leave a comment:


  • SemiAutoFetish
    replied
    Originally posted by HulkSmash22 View Post
    Mine doesn’t seem to rotate. I guess my question is, if it rotates, how do you eventually stop it from rotating so you can remove it from the T handle? Just trying to make sure I understand so that I buy the right stuff. Since I’m not doing it until the weekend amazon prime is my friend. Any suggestions on a complete kit that has bore brushes, jags and rod? Or is it best to piece it out? Calibers I have are 22, 9, 40, 223/556 and 12 gauge.
    Just hold the rod with your fingers from rotating. The brush should just be screwed on to the rod until it stops (no "torquing" needed). Outters cleaning kits typically use this type of rod

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  • HulkSmash22
    replied
    Originally posted by SemiAutoFetish View Post

    Make sure that if you're gonna stick a bore brush into the muzzle from the opposite end (muzzle end thru to receiver), that the guide rod rotates on the "T" handle after you've secured the brush on to the guide rod. This will ensure that bore brush DOES NOT rotate against the rotation of the rifling grooves when ramming back and forth thru the bore. There are some cheap ass cleaning kit rods that don't do this; throw that out and get yourself a rotating one.

    The GSG-5 22 being a 22, will definitely require more frequent disassembly and cleaning then the High Point. Definitely watch a few videos on this as the H&K style takedown is a little tricky; so get used to cleaning it or you will have issues with it sooner than later (FTF's, etc.).
    To be honest the High Point is not the easiest to takedown either.
    Mine doesn’t seem to rotate. I guess my question is, if it rotates, how do you eventually stop it from rotating so you can remove it from the T handle? Just trying to make sure I understand so that I buy the right stuff. Since I’m not doing it until the weekend amazon prime is my friend. Any suggestions on a complete kit that has bore brushes, jags and rod? Or is it best to piece it out? Calibers I have are 22, 9, 40, 223/556 and 12 gauge.

    Leave a comment:


  • HulkSmash22
    replied
    Originally posted by SemiAutoFetish View Post

    Make sure that if you're gonna stick a bore brush into the muzzle from the opposite end (muzzle end thru to receiver), that the guide rod rotates on the "T" handle after you've secured the brush on to the guide rod. This will ensure that bore brush DOES NOT rotate against the rotation of the rifling grooves when ramming back and forth thru the bore. There are some cheap ass cleaning kit rods that don't do this; throw that out and get yourself a rotating one.

    The GSG-5 22 being a 22, will definitely require more frequent disassembly and cleaning then the High Point. Definitely watch a few videos on this as the H&K style takedown is a little tricky; so get used to cleaning it or you will have issues with it sooner than later (FTF's, etc.).
    To be honest the High Point is not the easiest to takedown either.
    Yea the hi point is my bigger concern. I watched a few videos on the GSG last night and I’m fairly confident I can do it. I’m assuming (and hoping) I don’t have to take the bolt assembly apart. That ones it’s out of the receiver I can just clean the shit out of it as is. I’m gonna try to call hi point today and see if they can tell me how to clean and oil it without disassembling. That things supposed to run through dirt so I’m keeping my fingers crossed. Can you explain the guide/rotation thing in a little more detail?

    Leave a comment:


  • SemiAutoFetish
    replied
    Originally posted by Barnslayer View Post

    Not ideally but the only option with some firearms. There are rod guides to minimize muzzle damage on rifles. Using a fiberglass rod instead of a metal one helps too.
    Make sure that if you're gonna stick a bore brush into the muzzle from the opposite end (muzzle end thru to receiver), that the guide rod rotates on the "T" handle after you've secured the brush on to the guide rod. This will ensure that bore brush DOES NOT rotate against the rotation of the rifling grooves when ramming back and forth thru the bore. There are some cheap ass cleaning kit rods that don't do this; throw that out and get yourself a rotating one.

    The GSG-5 22 being a 22, will definitely require more frequent disassembly and cleaning then the High Point. Definitely watch a few videos on this as the H&K style takedown is a little tricky; so get used to cleaning it or you will have issues with it sooner than later (FTF's, etc.).
    To be honest the High Point is not the easiest to takedown either.
    Last edited by SemiAutoFetish; 03-10-2020, 03:31 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FDEMTNYC
    replied
    Originally posted by Barnslayer View Post

    Cover an empty table with a white bath towel (an old one so you don’t catch shit for it). Get all your supplies and tools together. Review the how to manual or video. Get to it. Knowing that each part is clean and in good shape goes a long way to reliability.
    I used to use those reusable hospital cloth bed chucks, now I just use the disposable “wee wee pads”. You can get them by the case on amazon. When you’re done, roll up all the used patches and such and toss it.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigbore44
    replied
    Take your own pictures during disassembly.

    Leave a comment:


  • Barnslayer
    replied
    Originally posted by HulkSmash22 View Post

    I'm gonna have to bite the bullet. I hate working with small pieces. Always afraid of losing something or fucking it up.
    Cover an empty table with a white bath towel (an old one so you don’t catch shit for it). Get all your supplies and tools together. Review the how to manual or video. Get to it. Knowing that each part is clean and in good shape goes a long way to reliability.

    Leave a comment:

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